Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

BGE Brisket

edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Over the weekend I tried my second brisket on the BGE. The one I had was small by Texas standards (4 pounds), but there are only two of us around to eat it. I used a standard rub overnight, and started cooking it at noon. According to the directions I had received I was shooting for a temperature of 160 deg., which I should have reached in about 6-8 hours cooking at a BGE temp of 210-220 deg. At 20:30 the temperature was 158 and had been there for about an hour. We went to dinner at the local BBQ pit, came home removed the brisket, wrapped it in foil and put in in the oven for another hour. Next day we tried it. It was good but not as tender as I was expecting. What am I doing wrong, or is this just one tough piece of meat? I tried looking in the archives, but could not find any thing other than empty URL's.

Comments

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Cliff, you were doing if fine at the 220 or you could even move that dome temp up to around 230 to 250. Your actual cooking grill temp is probably around 200. What you saw was the plateau of the meat stabilizing for several hours at the 160 area. Next time maintain your cooking till the meat reach's 190 to 200 internal in the thickest part (flat I think) of the brisket. slice ()across the grain. You can pull it at 190, and foil wrap, stick in a suitable small ice chest wrapped in towel and it will finish cook in the ice chest. (NO ICE of course)
    Good luck on the next one.
    C~W (Thats Char-Woody)

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,282
    Cliff,
    Like CW says, your 158 temp was the beginning of the long plateau where the tough stuff breaks down. That is the most important part of the cook when the tough chunk-o-chest is broken down into magical flavorful tenderness. Every brisket cooks differently, and sometimes the plateau can last for many hours. Again, like seedub says, kick up your temp closer to 250 if you are cooking over a drip pan, and allow a minimum of 2 hours pound (though per pound estimates are iffy with briskets....they seem to cook at a speed that depends on the thickness).[p]Unless you have a turbo-brisket (the prime grade like Cat gets), I would allow 10 hours at 250 indirect for that chunk you had. Seems like the most important factor to success is to allow extra time, and be prepared for a long plateau. Might be earlier, might be later....have your warm cooler ready for the rare instances when chunk-o-chests are done early![p]Keep at it....when you hit it right, you'll be hooked.
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature Boy,
    Thanks for the tip. I've had some real fine brisket during trips to Texas, and with the BGE I should be able to duplicate their success. Where can you find these turbo-briskets? Anyway I'll keep trying 'till I get it right.
    Cliff...

  • Char-Woody,
    Thanks C-W! I'm determined to get it right. There are a lot of recipes out there which say to aim for 160 deg meat temp. I guess my experience proves that you can't rely on everything you read.
    Cliff....[p]

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,282
    Cliff,
    I can't even find the prime grade briskets around here. The USDA Choice ones are excellent though. Plenty of marbling, and cook up tender and moist. Even the Select grade briskets can give you excellent results...just takes a little longer. Patience and time are the keys with briskets though. I usually don't open the dome at all until the polder reads 180. Then I do a fork test and close 'er back up if it is not done yet.[p]I have also found it to be a good idea to pull off at 180-185 regardless of fork test if you will be wrapping in foil and doing the warm cooler route for a couple hours. It will finish up in the cooler.[p]Keep us posted in your progress! Next one'll be a bullseye.
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    Cliff,[p]Brisket is a tough piece of meat along with being fickle in that each piece seems to cook differently (cooking times). Cooked right it is a real treat and well worth your time working with the cook. Brisket is also a fun cook.[p]I totally agree with the fine posts already made. I use the fork test for doneness and start testing at just over 180°F internal. The fork test is simple - just stick a fork vertically into the meat and slowly pull it out. The meat will want to rise with the fork when not yet done. When done, the fork will slide out without lifting the meat. The difference in 3 degrees (internal temp) is amazing. The thinner parts of the meat will finish quicker than the thicker areas. Removing, wrapping, and allowing a rest helps the thicker areas cook to completion while helping the thinner areas from drying.[p]Your four pounder is probably a flat cut. Flats tend to be shy on a decent fat cap to cook the meat under. A layer of slab bacon (or two of regular bacon - X pattern) will do nicely to replace a missing fat layer. Cover the meat entirely, including (and around) the edges.[p]I encourage you to have another go with brisket.[p]Spin

  • Spin,
    Thanks for your additional suggestions. Your suggestion about the bacon layer is something that I might try next time! Even though mine was not cooked long enough, it still is pretty tasty with the sauce that I serve on the side.
    Cliff...

Sign In or Register to comment.