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Using a cooler to finish the job

Grill With BillGrill With Bill Posts: 108
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I've been using a technique that seems to work pretty well for me. After I've slow cooked a brisket or pork butt and gotten the internal temperature to between 190* and 195* I remove the meat from the my egg, wrap it in foil and place it between some towels in a beer cooler for a couple of hours before serving. This seems finish off the cooking and keeps the food moist. [p]My question is: How long can I leave the meat in the cooler and still serve a safe, warm meal?[p]Bill

Comments

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,293
    Grill With Bill,
    Easily 3 hours, I have gone 4-5 hours. After the internal temp falls back below 140 or so, the risk starts increasing. You could always leave your polder probe in (poked thru the foil) and monitor it without opening the cooler.[p]Cheers
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Bill,[p]Your technique is great for holding your butts and brisket for additional time before serving. I would be difficult to tell you how long in the cooler as I think there are many things that would influence this time. The thickness of the meat would be the most important. The number of butts or briskets in the cooler, was the cooler warmed with hot water before the meat went in and at what temp do you want to serve the meat. I like to serve both of these meats no lower than about 140 degrees internal. As for safety, the meat could probably be served down to room temp without a problem. I often cook large amounts of meat in advance and let it come down to room temp before it goes in the fridge or freezer. This is just one fellows opinion and I'm sure you will get other information.[p]Old Dave[p]
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Grill With Bill, IMHO, about half hour to a hour on brisket and pork. I left brisket wrapped for 3 hours one time. (I forgot it) It became too mushy like pulled pork consistancy. Not like a good fresh sliceable brisket.
    C~W

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,293
    Char-Woody,
    What you say makes sense, but I served a brisket at a party after 4-5 hours in the cooler, and the texture was not at all like you describe. Sliced and served up very nicely, and was gone within 15 minutes! [p]As you describe, half hour to an hour, is optimum, but my 'speriences have shown that longer cooler periods can be had with good results. I wonder why yours was mushy.[p]I usually pull it off 185 if it will be in the cooler for a long time...as the cooking will finish in there.[p]Hot here today. Hope you be havin' some good Qin weather.
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Grill With Bill:[p]The following link gives some interesting information regarding brisket cooks as well as recommending that meat be stored between 140* and 160*. If you explore the site, there may be more of interest. Follow the link to "Danny's Barbecue Secrets"

  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    djm5x9[p]Sorry, here is the link . . .

    [ul][li]Danny's Barbecue Secrets[/ul]
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Nature Boy, [p]The brisket may have been the problem, but I find that when you wrap in foil after a cook its a down hill spiral in flavor and taste depending on the amount of time its wrapped. From baked to steamed taste. Foiling (tenting) is usually a 15 minute to half hour time, like pork loin, turkey, etc.
    I use foil extensively in a lot of cooks..contrary to some of the pro's. Dannys BBQ website covers it pretty good also. Thanks to Darryl to repost it.

    C~W

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,293
    Char-Woody,
    Thanks. Great points about the flavor. [p]I enjoy reading Danny's site. Reading through it makes me wonder if many of us are cooking our lo/slo cooks too slow...even at 250 indirect. He talks about 1.5 hours/pound. And his cooking level is 240-250. If you cook indirect at 270 dome temp, the cooking level temps would probably be in that range. I keep thinking back to when I cooked Elders brisket at 270 over a naked pizza stone. A 7 pounder took about 11 hours, and was perfectly tender and moist. If I was to cook it over liquid, it probably would have taken longer.[p]And 250 dome over water always takes me more than 2.5 hrs/pound.[p]Not trying to open up a stinky can of worms here, but can't help but wonder. [p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Nature Boy, Any time you cook over a barrier, add time to the cook ie: Firebricks, water/drippan/ whatever. A direct fire will cook quicker and a drier product. A hot moist indirect environment will produce a more tender less shrinkage meat and you can do it at the higher range of temperatures. Danny's webpages are great info librarys and for the most part right on. Yet you have to adjust some of it to the BGE cooking arena.
    C~W

  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Char-Woody:[p]Regarding Danny's site, you are absolutely correct. That is part of the cooking technique that comes along with time and experience. Ceramic cookers have unique characteristics that are different from all other cookers. Become one with your cooker. Then it will be easy interpolating tried and true methods of others on a different cooker to your cooker and have success the first time.[p]Huh? Did I say that? Excuse me, I need another Bud . . .[p]
  • Thanks for all the help. I think I have a general idea of the perameters now.[p]Bill
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Grill with Bill, nowaday's if we can just get ya to the General Parameter part, we consider ourselves lucky..And I think a chef of your capabilities had a pretty good grip on the handle anyway..!! I would love to do a "h
    !" here but I declined...think of it anyway!!
    Cheers..C~W[p]

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    djm5x9, I am glad you said it..and you should upgrade your beer supplier..:-)
    Interpolating?? I had to leap frog over that one as RJ says I am too dumb to understand it. :-)
    And there is a awful lot of that interpolating stuff going on, don't ya agree?
    Aw...ok..I will admit the group demolished my Bud Light supply over Fathers day..24 pack of reserve.
    Have a great one...
    C~W[p]

  • Grill With Bill,
    Here's a tip that may help. I take the meat off at 190-195 degrees, however, I put in a pan that fits, add the drippins and liquid, cover with foil and put in oven on warm for a couple hours or 12 pack, whichever comes first. lol. As for the liquid, i usually use beer, wine, fruit juice or water, dependin on the meat and spices used. This makes the meat done and juicy for certain. hope this helps.

  • ZipZip Posts: 372
    Nature Boy,[p]Pulling off short of the desired temperature is key. I take picnics off at 180° - 185° and pulled right before serving. I will take 20oz bottles filled with water and heated in the microwave with the top off. When they start to boil, cap and place in cooler. This will extend the above 140° for smaller pieces. Preheating the cooler is a must do if you need to serve more than three hours later. The polder will be your guide.[p]Z
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Char-Woody:[p]Upgrade from Bud? Nahhhhh! I have an image to keep! Besides, the premium beer is at a store a mile further up the road from The Park. Too cheap to burn the extra gas . . .[p]Interpolating technique . . . Becoming one with your cooker . . . Reading these words sounds kind of silly. Looking where I was two years ago and where I am now regarding my grilling skills these words ring very true. I learned these skills and honed them with the help of many knowledgeable folks on the forums. I appreciate their contributions to the forums and responses to my e-mails. Hey, none of that "group hug" stuff, but a sincere thanks to all of you forum folks. You know who you are! You know, Her may not realize it, but she appreciates you guys too! She is eating a hell of a lot better now than she ever has since she has been with me . . .
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    djm5x9, your last sentence is what makes it all worthwhile!
    Back to my Eggy Whing Ding!! Drafting some plans. So far so good.. I am going to whip that disk blade of Gerards yet. Where is that guy??
    C~W[p]

  • J AppledogJ Appledog Posts: 1,046
    In English, please, Char-Woody!

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    J Appledog, here your are..finally found ya...well, if I did that it would be too revealing..its a surprise. I have to build a model..take photos..and have someone at BGE post em...!
    Cheers...stay cool...C~W[p]

  • J AppledogJ Appledog Posts: 1,046
    Char-Woody, When you're hot, you're hot! When you're not, you're Scott.

  • J AppledogJ Appledog Posts: 1,046
    Char-Woody, When you're hot, you're hot! When you're not, you're Scott.

  • Char-Woody,[p]In your previouis post you said the following of me, "And I think a chef of your capabilities had a pretty good grip on the handle anyway..!!" You must be confusing me with someone else. But thanks anyway.[p]Bill

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Grill With Bill, no confusion my friend, I tested your Haddock fish recipe, and it was terrific.
    Cheers...C~W[p]

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    J Appledog, you just gotta quit those double exposures, or is it the "Mac" thing..Not Mac, Mac, but Mac...oh well.....!
    C~W[p]

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