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it was....okay

mollysharkmollyshark Posts: 1,519
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Finally got tired of waiting for the brisket and pulled it off at 185. Woulda been way too late to go to the recommended 205. Ended up pretty tender, but not as flavorful as I would have liked. Not enough smokey taste, I think. Need to be much more heavy-handed with the hickory chips. Smoke ring was not quite a quarter inch. Also this brisket didn't have much of a fat cap. Here and there...and where there WAS fat, the meat directly underneath was the most tender. Anything else I should be pondering for next try?

Comments

  • JJJJ Posts: 951
    MollyShark,
    I have cooked abut 300 of these things. Next time go with mesquite and put the brisket on when the internal temp is about 80*. This is when the meat will absorb the most smoke and its flavor. I know you have been advised to limit the amount of fat cap but I look for the most I can find. I use a drip pan and v-rack and cook at 250* for about 18 hrs or until the fork comes out easy or the internal temp is 190-200* then pulled, wraped in foil and allowed to rest for atleast 45 min befor slicing acrossed the grain. No failures yet.

  • mollysharkmollyshark Posts: 1,519
    JJ,
    Interesting. Why mesquite instead of hickory. And I did NOT bring it to room temp before tossing it on. Obviously a problem. When you say you go for 18 hours, does size/weight enter into it? I figured 2 hrs a pound and was obviously a little short.

  • JJJJ Posts: 951
    MollyShark,
    Hickory is not as strong a wood flavor as mesquite and IMO mesquite does a better job with brisket. The cooler the meat the longer the smoke has to penetrate it. Hrs per pound is a good rule of thumb for openers. The variable is the degree of toughness and the amount of time for the meat fibers to break down. Weight does matter in the cooking time, however, each brisket will vary in the amount of time it takes to reach its maximum tenderness. I like to start with 16 hrs and check each hour after that. That is my method, others will have different views. None right and none wrong, Just what works for them.

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    MollyShark, as usual, JJ is hammering the nail in the right spot.. I might add that if you bring the brisket to room temperature, and then use Cat's quick freeze of the exterior, and a slow start on the smoke..you will enhance the smoke penetration. Some don't like the deep smoke and prefer a light smoke ring. And Like JJ, I like good fat cap on the meat for self basting.. Your cook proved the point with the tenderest portions under the best fat cap area's.[p]You will gain ground as you go in your Brisket attempts.
    Its really a simple cook.
    Had a great Fathers Day today and hope everyone else fell in the same canoe....:-)
    Cheers...C~W[p]

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