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Fat cap up or down? -brisket-

I've only done one small brisket flat, it turned out really good (I think), did it fat cap on top with a basic rub, low, slow ect...
My parents are coming to visit in a 10 days and I really want to knock them on their back side with this. So I've been doing some research and I've heard fat cap on top keeps the meat moist, others call BS and say it just runs off the side and into the tray. Thoughts or opinions on the topic? I'd love to hear from y'all.

Also thoughts of liquid in a pan under it, basting in occasionally, the necessity of foil wrap and rest in a cooler.

I'm ordering my cut from Snake River Farms and I really just want the meat and the egg to do the talking.

Thanks.
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Comments

  • I don't notice a big difference. With butts I usually go fat down just because something is going to stick to the grate a little so I figure it might as well be the fat instead of meat. Same principle would apply to brisket I assume but I am certainly no expert. I have done both with no noticeable difference, but I have never done a SNF brisky either.
    LBGE 2013, SBGE 2014, Mini 2015
    Columbus IN
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  • jhl192jhl192 Posts: 791
    I go Fat cap on top for no other reason than it makes sense that the fat would seep into the meat as it renders and keeps it moist.  That and the fact that Aaron Franklin does it fat cap up.  Others will tell you it makes no difference and they could be correct.  
    XL BGE; Medium BGE 
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  • Ladeback69Ladeback69 Posts: 1,791
    I don't notice a big difference. With butts I usually go fat down just because something is going to stick to the grate a little so I figure it might as well be the fat instead of meat. Same principle would apply to brisket I assume but I am certainly no expert. I have done both with no noticeable difference, but I have never done a SNF brisky either.

    I agree, fat side down and you will build a better bark on the top side that way.  The can't really absorb any of the fat while cooking and it is a wastes of rub if you put it on the fat side.  You will usually notice that the smoke ring is on the non-fat side so it makes sense to put the fat side down.  That is how I have been doing it and the competition class I took the Pro said that's what he does and he has won a lot of contest.  remember to put a drip pan down.  How big are you going?  I like doing a full packer so I can make burnt ends out of the point.  Good luck in the cook.  I think I am doing one this wekend my self.

    XL, WSM 
    Kansas City, Mo.
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  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,231
    I use a drip pan and usually put some water in it. I don't expect this to affect the cook but to catch the drippings and keep them from burning on the plate setter and affecting the taste of the brisket.

    I wrap in foil (at about 160 degrees) if I am in a hurry.

    I've tried both fat up and down and didn't notice any difference.  I usually put it down so that is what sticks to the grill, not the meat.

    I never baste, mop, or spray since the BGE shouldn't require it.  If there is time before dinner time, I will foil the brisket and put it in a cooler.
    Barry Lancaster, PA
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  • cazzycazzy Posts: 7,175
    Stand it up on it's side and get the best of both worlds.   :P
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ...
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  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,948

    I go fat cap down for reasons sited above. With the drip pan-no need for any liquid-just elevate the pan off the platesetter (air gap) to keep any drippings from burning.  With the SRF brisket you will have a great piece of beef.  Just use S&P for the rub.  Also, it may hit the finish-line sooner (lower temp) than your experience with the flat.  Start checking for doneness once you get into the low 180's.  And personal opinion-don't go down the burnt ends road-just slice and enjoy the point.  FWIW-

    Louisville
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  • cazzycazzy Posts: 7,175
    edited July 2014
    Maybe I should go here. Hahaha

    I go fat cap up!! :D
    image
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ...
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  • Philly35Philly35 Posts: 536
    cazzy said:

    Stand it up on it's side and get the best of both worlds.   :P

    That is some excellent advice! Perhaps that'll be the new thing!

    NW IOWA
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  • BoatswainBoatswain Posts: 27
    Thanks for all the input. I probably won't make up my mind until I'm setting it on the grid.

    @Ladeback69 - I'm going with the 11-14lb. now i just have to decide if I want the standard cut or spring for the "Gold Grade".

    @lousubcap - I'll keep that low 180's thing in mind. Thats some good advice, I didn't even think about the increased overall fat content of the meat effecting the finish temp.

    @cazzy - if I'm just cooking for myself one weekend, i may just turn one in its side for the hell of it, if i do, Ill post it. Also that picture looks amazing.

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  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 1,134
    I go fat cap down to add further protection of the leaner meat from the heat source. I don't use a drip pan or anything though. The egg will produce a great moist product either way I'm sure. Good luck!
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  • Ladeback69Ladeback69 Posts: 1,791
    Boatswain said:

    Thanks for all the input. I probably won't make up my mind until I'm setting it on the grid.


    @Ladeback69 - I'm going with the 11-14lb. now i just have to decide if I want the standard cut or spring for the "Gold Grade".

    @lousubcap - I'll keep that low 180's thing in mind. Thats some good advice, I didn't even think about the increased overall fat content of the meat effecting the finish temp.

    @cazzy - if I'm just cooking for myself one weekend, i may just turn one in its side for the hell of it, if i do, Ill post it. Also that picture looks amazing.

    I've only gotten choice mostly at my market or Sam's. I have cooked a couple prime on my Weber Smokey Mountain and they came out great. Choice or prime you should be good either way. Good luck.

    XL, WSM 
    Kansas City, Mo.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,986
    edited July 2014
    Bumping this as I want to retort on it when time permits later tonight.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • thailandjohnthailandjohn Posts: 952
    Down on both brisket and butts....fat will not render through the meat with fat up and the fat does protect the bottom and you will not lose any of the good bark....low and slow for me and only wrapping to rest....butcher paper for brisket, foil for butt
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