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Good quality knives?

I'm looking for some suggestions on a good quality knife set.  The knives in the block set my wife has in the kitchen are terrible and won't hold an edge.

XL & Mini-Max

Chattanooga, TN

«13

Comments

  • onedbguruonedbguru Posts: 1,495
    I know some here are not fans, but I have had Cutco for more than 35yrs and only sent them in for sharpening (lifetime guarantee) once about 3-4 years ago... and then not all of them.  ( I was a sales person for just a few months, think I made < $100.)  I am not sure if the quality is the same now as it was then... 

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 8,299
    Cutco is alright, I'm a fan of Mundial - made in USA. Inexpensive and good edge retention. 

    Chef's Depot has a fine selection - and while you are there check out their 13.5" and 16" pizza stones. The 13.5" is ideal for MBGE/LBGE and is good to 2000ºF (or so they say, as I never go above 600º I have no idea if it will take super high temps)
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
  • 1move1move Posts: 510
    I like my henckel knives, they are pretty awesome. I also have some Japanese knives that are much stronger steel and are much sharper but are more expensive.
    XLBGE, MMBGE, CyberQ
  • rstermanrsterman Posts: 119
    I have made it a point to use good quality japanese cutlery.....they are reasonably expensive, but the shun series of knives are hard to beat in my opinion.....
    Berlin, Maryland
  • tksmoketksmoke Posts: 776
    edited June 2014

    Shun and Henkels have several different product lines, with a wide variety in cost and quality.  Buying a Shun doesn't necessarily guarantee that you will have a great knife.  I have Shuns Henkels, Cutcos,etc. - I always thought the Henkels were horrible until I started sharpening them.  When sharpened correctly, they are awesome.  So are the Shuns.  I also have some very old Chicago Cutlery knives, and properly sharpened they are awesome too.  So maybe the knives in your block only need sharpening.

    The Work Sharp Ken Onion sharpener is easy to use and very effective at producing a great edge.  Once sharpened, different steels will maintain an edge differently.  That is one of the things you pay for in high quality knives.  So if your knife will hold an edge at all, having a lower quality knife might mean you need to sharpen it more often.  There are many more factors that go into determining what makes a high quality knife, but I tend to think in terms of the functional specs.  Shuns are beautiful. 

    People who like knives are just about as passionate about them as people who like BGEs. 

    Santa Paula, CA
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,690
    +1 on the cutco. mine have served me well for 15+ years. I sharpen now with the work sharp sharpener.
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • jllbmsjllbms Posts: 381
    Just go to a restaurant supply store and get their basic white plastic handle knives. It's what the chefs use. I have a few and I pick them up more often than my "expensive" knives. LOL, Cutco. I sold it, too, back in 1973. I don't know what became of the set I had. I got sick of the serrated edges, and bought some "real" knives. We had to do tricks to demonstrate how sharp they were compared to the knife of the prospective customer. They always had crap knives. I'd love to be on the receiving end of a Cutco demo now. I guarantee that my freshly steeled restaurant supply knife would hold up to the Cutco!
    Kemah, TX
  • badinfluencebadinfluence Posts: 1,774
    I got a set of hammer Stahl cutlery and am pretty happy with them
    1 XXL BGE,  1 LG BGE, 2 MED. BGE, 1 MINI BGE, 1 Peoria custom cooker Meat Monster.


    Clinton, Iowa
  • SCeggerSCegger Posts: 3
    I agree with the Cutco fans!  These knives are awesome!

  • msloanmsloan Posts: 365
    Zwilling-JA Henckels Twin Cuisine 2's for me…..they are awesome!
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 2,047
    What is your price range?

    I ask because I am a knife fanatic. I spend way too much time on knife forums, I am getting into making my own knives, and I am friends with a couple guys who make custom knives for a living. 

    If your price range is that of Cutco or the high end knives would find in a place like Williams-Sonoma I highly recommend you look at custom knives. Will be about same price, maybe cheaper. And you get to choose steel type, blade length, handle material, etc. Will have something no one else will have. And you can have made to fit your needs.  Can choose quantity and blade type. When you buy a kit that is not option. A lot of benefits. 

    If you do not want to go custom, which again I cannot recommend enough, then I recommend going to a place like Williams-Sonoma and holding knife in your hand. Don't buy a kit. Because the chef's knife by brand A might be best for you but their paring knife is not comfortable and brand B is better. And you can buy piece by piece 1) as you need 2) as you can afford. And with buying single you don't get knives that you will never or rarely use. 

    And whether you follow and of the above advice or not, whether you buy Cutco from a kid or a cheap set from Target, the absolute most important thing is keeping them sharpened. The best way to keep a sharp knife is to never let it get dull. One of the best, fool-proof, reliable, and most recommended home sharpeners is the Tr-Angle Sharpmaker by Spyderco. This will not reprofile a knife very well and it is not best for when a knife is already very dull. But if you buy a knife it will be amazing at keeping it sharpened. Couple minutes a week and knives are good to go. Edgepro, strops, or sending to professional best way if knife is already very dull or needs reprofiled. 

    If you decide to go custom let me know and I can guide you.
    Boom
  • danv23danv23 Posts: 781
    Love my Globals


    image

    The Dude: This is a very complicated case, Maude. You know, a lotta ins, lotta outs, lotta what-have-you's. And, uh, lotta strands to keep in my head, man. Lotta strands in old Duder's head. Luckily I'm adhering to a pretty strict, uh, drug regimen to keep my mind, you know, limber.

    Walter Sobchak: Nihilists! *uck me. I mean, say what you want about the tenets of National Socialism, Dude, at least it's an ethos. 

    Cumming, GA

    Eggs - XL, L, Small

    Gasser - Weber Summit 6 Burner

  • msloanmsloan Posts: 365
    @fanoffanboys…….although i love my knives i got from williams-sonama…..im not sure i want to take them with me on a competition run…..so i might be interested in the customs you mention……guidance please  :)
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 2,047
    msloan said:

    @fanoffanboys…….although i love my knives i got from williams-sonama…..im not sure i want to take them with me on a competition run…..so i might be interested in the customs you mention……guidance please  :)

    Once I'm on PC I'll PM you names of few different custom guys you can reach out to.

    Boom
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 2,061
    My next chef knife will be a Whusthof.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • jllbmsjllbms Posts: 381
    I could scarcely put "Cutco" and "high end" in the same sentence! :))
    Kemah, TX
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 2,047
    jllbms said:

    I could scarcely put "Cutco" and "high end" in the same sentence! :))

    Care to elaborate why? What about the production process, heat treatment, or steel that they use do you specifically have an issue with?

    Big difference in them being overpriced or sold in a shady way or exaggerated marketing and them not being quality.
    Boom
  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 1,895
    Those globals are pretty but I can't hold on to them when the handle gets wet... I still want a G2 though. ;)

    Not to contradict what has been said, but I am good friends with many chefs in my area.


    With very rare exception - Shun. Period.


    IMHO If you build your set knife by knife and have the patience to seek out the good online deal, they are not as expensive as they seem. And they're beautiful. I'm making a knife magnet so I can have the blades shown like a piece of art.


    image
    Large BGE and Medium BGE
    36" Blackstone - Greensboro!


  • msloanmsloan Posts: 365
    @fanoffanboys…….although i love my knives i got from williams-sonama…..im not sure i want to take them with me on a competition run…..so i might be interested in the customs you mention……guidance please  :)
    Once I'm on PC I'll PM you names of few different custom guys you can reach out to.
    ok sounds great!  thanks a bunch!
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
  • KenfromMIKenfromMI Posts: 742
    Plenty of good knives, I prefer German Cutlery or Shun Ken Onion. Ive never had to take them to a stone and I use them everyday. A few swipes on the steel and the edge is perfect for the next use. 
    Dearborn MI
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 13,959
    I like Japanese steel for most tasks. I have a heavy blade for breaking down(cutting through bone) meat that is German. Kikuichi is a nice line along with Konosuke. My dream knife is a Takeda gyuto. I can't remember if @FanOfFanboys‌ or @Lit has one.

    Chefknivestogo.com is probably the best site online to get started with researching what you'd like. Their forum is great. Figure out what steel type you'd like and then decide on manufacturer. If you have an independent shop, they will have some of the small manufacturers. Williams Sonoma will only have Shun and Global.
  • danv23danv23 Posts: 781
    What is your price range?

    I ask because I am a knife fanatic. I spend way too much time on knife forums, I am getting into making my own knives, and I am friends with a couple guys who make custom knives for a living. 

    If your price range is that of Cutco or the high end knives would find in a place like Williams-Sonoma I highly recommend you look at custom knives. Will be about same price, maybe cheaper. And you get to choose steel type, blade length, handle material, etc. Will have something no one else will have. And you can have made to fit your needs.  Can choose quantity and blade type. When you buy a kit that is not option. A lot of benefits. 

    If you do not want to go custom, which again I cannot recommend enough, then I recommend going to a place like Williams-Sonoma and holding knife in your hand. Don't buy a kit. Because the chef's knife by brand A might be best for you but their paring knife is not comfortable and brand B is better. And you can buy piece by piece 1) as you need 2) as you can afford. And with buying single you don't get knives that you will never or rarely use. 

    And whether you follow and of the above advice or not, whether you buy Cutco from a kid or a cheap set from Target, the absolute most important thing is keeping them sharpened. The best way to keep a sharp knife is to never let it get dull. One of the best, fool-proof, reliable, and most recommended home sharpeners is the Tr-Angle Sharpmaker by Spyderco. This will not reprofile a knife very well and it is not best for when a knife is already very dull. But if you buy a knife it will be amazing at keeping it sharpened. Couple minutes a week and knives are good to go. Edgepro, strops, or sending to professional best way if knife is already very dull or needs reprofiled. 

    If you decide to go custom let me know and I can guide you.
    Hey, what do you recommend to sharpen my Globals?  I've read a bunch of stuff that Japanese knives need different sharpeners, etc, and you sure seem to know what you're talking about!

    The Dude: This is a very complicated case, Maude. You know, a lotta ins, lotta outs, lotta what-have-you's. And, uh, lotta strands to keep in my head, man. Lotta strands in old Duder's head. Luckily I'm adhering to a pretty strict, uh, drug regimen to keep my mind, you know, limber.

    Walter Sobchak: Nihilists! *uck me. I mean, say what you want about the tenets of National Socialism, Dude, at least it's an ethos. 

    Cumming, GA

    Eggs - XL, L, Small

    Gasser - Weber Summit 6 Burner

  • msloanmsloan Posts: 365
    @fanoffanboys  thanks for the spyderco recommendation…..i just checked it out online and liked it so much had my wife order me one for my birthday!
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
  • Austin  EggheadAustin Egghead Posts: 3,893
    I am an knive-aholic, but I don't own any one set.  I buy for the task intended.  The 36 hole block houses a variety from Shun, Messermiester, Global, Henkels, Japanses made, carbon steel.  Knives are very personal,  be sure and take one for a test drive and see it is right for your hand and has a good feel and balance. 
    Google Cutlery and More for good info.
    If you want a versatile and cheap knife  Forshner Victrinox Fibrox is a good deal.
    Large, small and mini now Egging in Rowlett Tx
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,830
    If cost is an issue, the Victorinox Fibrox line consistently rates as one of the best buys. Shuns are good, and look great. They are rather pricey compared to other knives that perform as well. I knew a guy who slowly assembled a set of J.A. Henckels, don't know which of the Twin lines it was, but they could take and hold a good edge. I suggest not buying a set, but assembling what you need a piece at a time. Concentrate on what you use most, and spend more $ on those. Do some research. Most good knives have info available about the Rockwell hardness. Higher is usually better. Many will specify the steel, and if it was heat treated. For instance, a common stainless used for knives is the 440 line. 440 A is considered just adequate. 440 C is quite good. From what I've been told, the trusty Dexter-Russel line found in so many commercial kitchens uses the same steel as those made by Lamson & Goodnow, but the Lamsons are very well heat treated, and can take and hold a much better edge.
  • KenfromMIKenfromMI Posts: 742
    Victorinox is probably the best bang for the buck in Cutlery I agree.
    Dearborn MI
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 2,047
    gdenby said:

    If cost is an issue, the Victorinox Fibrox line consistently rates as one of the best buys.

    Shuns are good, and look great. They are rather pricey compared to other knives that perform as well.

    I knew a guy who slowly assembled a set of J.A. Henckels, don't know which of the Twin lines it was, but they could take and hold a good edge.

    I suggest not buying a set, but assembling what you need a piece at a time. Concentrate on what you use most, and spend more $ on those.

    Do some research. Most good knives have info available about the Rockwell hardness. Higher is usually better. Many will specify the steel, and if it was heat treated. For instance, a common stainless used for knives is the 440 line. 440 A is considered just adequate. 440 C is quite good. From what I've been told, the trusty Dexter-Russel line found in so many commercial kitchens uses the same steel as those made by Lamson & Goodnow, but the Lamsons are very well heat treated, and can take and hold a much better edge.

    Harder/higher number doesn't mean better. There are trade offs. Harder means sharpen less but also means harder to sharpen and more brittle/prone to chipping.

    Something 58-61 range is what you'll see most often but even then doesn't paint much of a picture. Different steels do better at different hardness and some companies are much better at the heat treat process than others.

    Not arguing with you, just elaborating on your post. Rest I fully agree with.
    Boom
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 2,047
    msloan said:

    @fanoffanboys  thanks for the spyderco recommendation…..i just checked it out online and liked it so much had my wife order me one for my birthday!

    Awesome. You'll love. Not sure where you ordered from but like $45 on Amazon, for reference.

    YouTube will have a lot of videos if you need guidance using.

    Just remember it is meant to maintain edge, not create edge.
    Boom
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 2,047
    danv23 said:



    What is your price range?

    I ask because I am a knife fanatic. I spend way too much time on knife forums, I am getting into making my own knives, and I am friends with a couple guys who make custom knives for a living. 

    If your price range is that of Cutco or the high end knives would find in a place like Williams-Sonoma I highly recommend you look at custom knives. Will be about same price, maybe cheaper. And you get to choose steel type, blade length, handle material, etc. Will have something no one else will have. And you can have made to fit your needs.  Can choose quantity and blade type. When you buy a kit that is not option. A lot of benefits. 

    If you do not want to go custom, which again I cannot recommend enough, then I recommend going to a place like Williams-Sonoma and holding knife in your hand. Don't buy a kit. Because the chef's knife by brand A might be best for you but their paring knife is not comfortable and brand B is better. And you can buy piece by piece 1) as you need 2) as you can afford. And with buying single you don't get knives that you will never or rarely use. 

    And whether you follow and of the above advice or not, whether you buy Cutco from a kid or a cheap set from Target, the absolute most important thing is keeping them sharpened. The best way to keep a sharp knife is to never let it get dull. One of the best, fool-proof, reliable, and most recommended home sharpeners is the Tr-Angle Sharpmaker by Spyderco. This will not reprofile a knife very well and it is not best for when a knife is already very dull. But if you buy a knife it will be amazing at keeping it sharpened. Couple minutes a week and knives are good to go. Edgepro, strops, or sending to professional best way if knife is already very dull or needs reprofiled. 

    If you decide to go custom let me know and I can guide you.

    Hey, what do you recommend to sharpen my Globals?  I've read a bunch of stuff that Japanese knives need different sharpeners, etc, and you sure seem to know what you're talking about!

    Ha well let's clarify I have no idea what I'm talking about. Just ask any ex-girlfriend ha.

    But I'm not aware of any knife needing something special just because it's Japanese. I could be wrong but I don't see why it would. It's steel and an angle. Nothing special. Find what angle needs to be at and go from there.

    For maintaining edge I can't recommend Tri-Angle enough. For creating edge unless you know what you're doing just find a pro to do for you. I know of two in USA that are amazing and you can ship to if you don't have one locally.
    Boom
  • msloanmsloan Posts: 365
    @fanoffanboys  thanks for the spyderco recommendation…..i just checked it out online and liked it so much had my wife order me one for my birthday!
    Awesome. You'll love. Not sure where you ordered from but like $45 on Amazon, for reference. YouTube will have a lot of videos if you need guidance using. Just remember it is meant to maintain edge, not create edge.
    she ordered it from amazon!!!
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
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