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Chicken Stock, how do y'all do it?

jls9595jls9595 Posts: 1,519
I just put the carcass and some other bones in a pot and added water, salt and pepper. Brought to a boil and simmered for an hour or so. Is there anything else I need to do?
In Manchester, TN
Vol For Life!

Comments

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 12,615
    Next time add mirepoix and aromatics.
  • hapsterhapster Posts: 7,420
    For my chicken stock that I turn into soups...

    Carrots, celery, onion, parsley, sea salt, pepper and one flat of chicken quarters.

    Bring to a boil and let it simmer for a few hours. Remove the chicken and the remove as much fat as you can off the surface. Chill it overnight is the easiest way...
  • jls9595jls9595 Posts: 1,519
    Next time add mirepoix and aromatics.
    Ok, I had to look that up.  Will do that next time.  I normally add stock to my soups and figured I'd make some today since I de-boned a chicken.  It smells good anyway. 
    In Manchester, TN
    Vol For Life!
  • Common mistake is to add too much water because you're wanting more stock.
  • jls9595jls9595 Posts: 1,519
    I may have made that mistake. I added more after the first 20 min.  Oh well.
    In Manchester, TN
    Vol For Life!
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 10,142
    Last time I did it, I used thighs. They made some tasty chicken salad afterward. I've also done it with the carcass. More meat is better. And as said, don't forget the veggies. I don't add salt as I prefer to add that to whatever I'm making with the stock. 


    I will not eat oysters. I want my food dead. Not sick, not wounded... dead.

                                                      Woody Allen

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • GrannyX4GrannyX4 Posts: 1,474
    jls9595 said:
    I may have made that mistake. I added more after the first 20 min.  Oh well.

    You are still ok, when you remove all the bones put the broth back on the stove and bring to a rapid boil and reduce until you have a rich broth. Don't salt until the broth has reduce or you will end up with salty broth.
    Every day is a bonus day and every meal is a banquet in Winter Springs, Fl !
  • Granny.  I never salt my chicken broth/stock when making it.  I add salt, as necessary, when I am preparing the dish that it goes in.  You can always add salt, but you can't take it away.

  • jls9595jls9595 Posts: 1,519
    well...I added salt already. salty stock I guess.
    In Manchester, TN
    Vol For Life!
  • @jls9595  You will make many, many batches of chicken (and beef and shrimp) stock once you realize how much better it is than store bought.  Take these suggestions for what they are, and come up with your own formula.

    One suggestion that hasn't been mentioned is to roast the bones in the oven for an hour or so, especially with beef.  It gives the stock more complexity.
  • jls9595jls9595 Posts: 1,519
    thanks for all the suggestions. I have bookmarked for the next time.
    In Manchester, TN
    Vol For Life!
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,065
    Pendejo said:

    One suggestion that hasn't been mentioned is to roast the bones in the oven for an hour or so, especially with beef.  It gives the stock more complexity.
    Yep, this.  If you are starting with raw chicken carcass, definitely roast before making the stock.  Also, leeks are another good vegetable to add to make stock.  And whole peppercorns.

    I just spatchcocked a chicken to make gumbo.  I threw the backbone on the grill with the chicken.  Pulled most of the meat off of the cooked chicken then made stock out of the backbone and carcass.  Came out great!!
    NOLA
  • stantrbstantrb Posts: 139
    Y'all are doing it the hard way. Take your chicken bones from a spatchcocked bird, cover with water, ad veggies and whatever, and park the sucker in a 225* oven all night long. Come back the next day to no hassle stock.
    Minimax and a wood-fired oven.
  • hapster said:
    For my chicken stock that I turn into soups... Carrots, celery, onion, parsley, sea salt, pepper and one flat of chicken quarters. Bring to a boil and let it simmer for a few hours. Remove the chicken and the remove as much fat as you can off the surface. Chill it overnight is the easiest way…
    Same method, except I use a pressure cooker, also helps if you snap some bones with a cleaver.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 5,499
    stantrb said:
    Y'all are doing it the hard way. Take your chicken bones from a spatchcocked bird, cover with water, ad veggies and whatever, and park the sucker in a 225* oven all night long. Come back the next day to no hassle stock.
    Our method is somewhat similar but we don't use any fuel all night long ... after boiling/simmering through for 10-15 minutes, we stick it in a Thermos pot (see link below), temperature is still well above the >140F safety zone even after 5, 6 or 7 hours of standing; we can reboil at any convenient time and let it stand further if desired.  no fuel, no babysitting, no boil over, no hogging of stove.
    canuckland
  • stantrbstantrb Posts: 139
    @Canugghead: do you get good collagen extraction at that low heat? Are the bones brittle when you strain the next day?
    Minimax and a wood-fired oven.
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 5,499
    Yup, after chilling the stock gels.  Usually reboil at 4-5 hour mark when temp is still in the 180+ range (it's almost like making stock/soup sous vide way!). Bones get brittle after 2 or 3 reboils but for soup we don't go that long.
    canuckland
  • Boyz, yer all talking about broth. Broth is mainly meat, stock is mainly bones. Roast them bones and mirepoix.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 5,499
    Steve, I'm talking about the boil/simmer stage only.... whether it's soup, broth or stock, roast or no roast, w/ or w/o mirepoix, they all go through boil/simmer, no?  :-/ 
    canuckland
  • BotchBotch Posts: 4,491
    stantrb said:
    @Canugghead: do you get good collagen extraction at that low heat? Are the bones brittle when you strain the next day?
     
    I tried Alton Brown's recipe once, he stated that pores in the bones will close off if boiled hard, but if simmered gently the bones would leach collagen through those pores.
    I didn't quite believe it, but tried it once, pot full of raw wings lightly simmered for 8 hours + aromatics.  After straining and chilling in the frig overnight, like Canugghead said, it was completely gelatinized!  And delicious!  
    Oh yeah, the bones snapped like spaghetti, as on Alton's show.  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 5,499
    edited February 2014
    Botch said:
    stantrb said:
    @Canugghead: do you get good collagen extraction at that low heat? Are the bones brittle when you strain the next day?
     
    I tried Alton Brown's recipe once, he stated that pores in the bones will close off if boiled hard, but if simmered gently the bones would leach collagen through those pores.
    I didn't quite believe it, but tried it once, pot full of raw wings lightly simmered for 8 hours + aromatics.  After straining and chilling in the frig overnight, like Canugghead said, it was completely gelatinized!  And delicious!  
    Oh yeah, the bones snapped like spaghetti, as on Alton's show.  
    Good point, I forgot to mention the following .... 
    1) when using roasted bones, leftover carcass or ham bones, we start with boiled water from the kettle
    2) when using raw bones/meat, we start with cold water on low heat and let it gently come up to low boil

    canuckland
  • Steve, I'm talking about the boil/simmer stage only.... whether it's soup, broth or stock, roast or no roast, w/ or w/o mirepoix, they all go through boil/simmer, no?  :-/ 
    You don't boil stock or broth. You simmer. It turns cloudy if you boil it. How bout them leafs eh?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 5,499
    Thanks for the education, good to know  :\">   Was watching Olympics.
    canuckland
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