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What to use for a large steak?

So a good friend of mine is coming over for his birthday dinner in a few weeks. Everyone coming to the party loves steak. There are not many coming (8). The guest of honor said last week that he never had a steak he could not finish. Well game on...  But the only thing I can think of is a large sirloin. Have the butcher carve me up a 48 - 56 oz one.  Anyone else have any suggestions?  If there is no good sirloin available, I was thinking of making him a couple of bone in ribeyes as that is the only other option I could think of - but that is what I was going to get everyone else, so I was looking to get something that set him apart.

I would like to hear everyone's ideas or thoughts.
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Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
....just look for the smoke!
Large and MiniMax
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Comments

  • I'd go to the shop and ask for a bone in ribeye and ask him to cut it thick.  My buddy almost always gets what I refer to as a cowboy ribeye cut 3-4 inches thick. 
    I raise my kids, cook and golf.  When work gets in the way I'm pissed, I'm pissed off 48 weeks a year.
    Inbetween Iowa and Colorado, not close to anything remotely entertaining outside of football season. 
  • RRPRRP Posts: 19,507
    edited December 2013
    While I understand the idea of a challenge I personally would go for quality over quantity! Anybody who can afford it can serve a glutton a huge piece of meat, which he won't remember after the morning anyway, but only an egger can give that same person a delicious steak that he will long remember. As for the cut I'd also suggest a tasty, slab of rib eye.
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • grege345grege345 Posts: 3,515
    Bone in ribeye. No doubt.
    LBGE& SBGE———————————————•———————– Pennsylvania / poconos

  • RRP +1, quality always trumps quantity!
    Hood Stars, Wrist Crowns and Obsession Dobs!


  • Me I would get a very thick cut Porterhouse like 48 to 56 oz like you said and call it a day
    2 Large Eggs and a Mini 2 Pit Bulls and a Pork shoulder or butt nearby and 100% SICILIAN
    Long Island N.Y.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 12,786
    Grab a really thick Ribeye with the bone, almost like a mini rib roast. Reverse sear it. One of my favorite ways to do it.
  • 1 1/2 to 2" bone in Ribeye reverse seared on the egg always gets rave reviews at my house.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Welcome to the Swamp.....GO GATORS!!!!
  • I have done a couple of spectacular steaks, like three inchers, and come to the conclusion that when they are that thick they don't turn out as well.  A ribeye roast is pretty fantastic and turns out well, as would a crown roast.

    XLBGE X 2, LBGE (gave this one to my daughter), MBGE and lots of toys

  • Or, if this is a 'tough guy' bet, find the biggest worst cut of beef and cook it just past his desired internal temp.
    Hood Stars, Wrist Crowns and Obsession Dobs!


  • The Old 96'r.

    Louisville, GA - 2 Large BGE's
  • RRPRRP Posts: 19,507
    I have done a couple of spectacular steaks, like three inchers, and come to the conclusion that when they are that thick they don't turn out as well.  A ribeye roast is pretty fantastic and turns out well, as would a crown roast.
    When they are that thick they really benefit from the hot tub method. At least that is my go to method with repeated success.
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 19,917
    big dry aged ribeye :D dry aged steaks are way more filling, i would say atleast twice as filling as a steak not dryaged
  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 1,610
    Thanks for the feedback I went to the local grocery store, and talked to the manager of the meat department. He is going to hook me up with 4 seperate 1-1/2 to 1 3/4 bone in ribeyes, and one 3 inch bone in, ribeye, and they will be CAB (certified Angus beef) All are going to be "frenched", and he will leave the bone a bit longer than normal for killer presentation. Planning on doing a reverse sear on them. Now the challenge is cooking time. 2 will be rare (the big thick one and mine), two medium, and 1 medium well (my wifes). I am thinking of going with simple kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper, and a mild dusting of cow lick DP. In terms of timing everything, this might be one of my more challenging cooks. I am also thinking of warming the steaks before putting on the egg in warm water (does 70 degree sound right?) ziplocked in individual bags for about 30 mins before cooking. Thoughts?
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    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
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  • allsidallsid Posts: 492
    Tomahawk rib eyes are pretty darn fun and hard to beat-
    image

    image

    image

    Serve on a cutting board for extra drama-  Have fun-

    As far as the cooking of the steaks, with the different thickness and all, just get a couple of different probe thermometers for each of the different temps.  Roast until you get your temp (minus 4 to 7 degrees for carryover) and then sear them all together 2 min a side.  

    Good luck-
    Proud resident of Missoula, MT
    https://www.facebook.com/GrillingMontana
    http://grillingmontana.com
    https://instagram.com/grillingmontana

    Check out my book on Kamado cooking called Exclusively Kamado:
    http://bit.ly/kamadobook

  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 1,610
    awesome!!!! I was not thinking of leaving the ribs that long, but.... hmmmmmmm... And I love the cutting board Idea - I have some rough, flat sawn 1" red oak boards 18" wide.... I will sand a piece down and router out his initials in it so he can have it to keep.....
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    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
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  • You sir, are a great friend to do all this for a buddy.
    Decatur, AL
  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 1,610
    Teedoff said:
    You sir, are a great friend to do all this for a buddy.

    He has had a tough year - divorced, does not make a lot of money, works hard for what he does make, sacrifices a ton for his kid, has been there for me without me asking every single time for the last 10+ years. I am fine financially, have the time, and he loves my cooking. Some time and a (hopefully) great meal for a fraction of the price is is worth every penny. I know he will appreciate it more knowing we did it just for him. Some things you can not put a price on, and a true friend is one of those things.
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    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
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  • I agree 100%.

    Decatur, AL
  • njlnjl Posts: 859
    How about a Porterhouse steak, cut 3-4 inches thick?  Depending on the size/config of your egg, you might be able to cook several at one time.  Cook at lower temp (due to thickness) and then sear.
  • +1 on the 2" bone-in ribeye. However, the too long bone is more of a nuisance and i would trim it down so the steaks fit. They almost fill a dinner plate anyway. Reverse sear or hot tub is the way to go. Would try to not worry about timing. Use a good meat thermometer. ~120 on low heat. Foil on a warm plate while you crank up the egg to 600, lower the grate to just just above the coals, then put the steaks back on 60-90 sec per side, remove and let rest for ~10 min, and carve on a cutting board with a board sauce (or compound butter) of olive oil, coarse salt, pepper, and flat leaf parsley. Good stuff.
  • allsidallsid Posts: 492
    Sea2Ski said:
    awesome!!!! I was not thinking of leaving the ribs that long, but.... hmmmmmmm... And I love the cutting board Idea - I have some rough, flat sawn 1" red oak boards 18" wide.... I will sand a piece down and router out his initials in it so he can have it to keep.....
    If you have the skills- go for a gutter around the board because there will be drippings.  Another idea if there is a beverage here… would be to route out a beverage holder as well, just a round spot where the brown liquid glass fits well.  Get ready to feel great about doing a favor for a close friend!  Good on ya-!

    PS:  one tip-  I have done those tomahawks twice and both times the bones were a few inches too long for my large for my liking.  I actually once reverse seared with the bone sticking out of the closed dome-
    Proud resident of Missoula, MT
    https://www.facebook.com/GrillingMontana
    http://grillingmontana.com
    https://instagram.com/grillingmontana

    Check out my book on Kamado cooking called Exclusively Kamado:
    http://bit.ly/kamadobook

  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 1,610
    edited December 2013
    Great comments and ideas! I will make sure to have him trim the bones short enough to make sure they fit on my large.
    I think the complexity of the cutting board is going to be directly related to how much time I have to put into it. I am thinking that the gutter is required though. All the juice is going to have to go somewhere... routing something around the perimeter should not be too difficult.

    Off to search for hot tubbing a steak - never did it before, but seems like a good idea as I get further into this cooking thing.
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    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
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