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Amazing Ribs baby backs, Meathead Sweet-Sour Slaw, and Houston's Lupe Tortilla's Charro Beans

txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
I am doing my first low and slow ribs tomorrow...and it is in the 30's and going to be raining!  Oh well...

I am doing the Amazing Ribs "Last Meal Ribs: The Best Barbecue Ribs You've Ever Tasted!"
http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/best_BBQ_ribs_ever.html
Prep using Meatheads Memphis Dust for the rub.
http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/rubs_pastes_marinades_and_brines/meatheads_memphis_dust.html
But I am using Sticky Pig Barbecue Sauce I acquired at the CGS (thanks Tom!).
http://www.stickypigbbq.com/barbecuesauce.htm 
I had to go there to get the extender and another oval grid, so I can do 4 full rack baby backs.  I guess I will just freeze the leftovers after the cook and dinner, we only have 4 people total and these slabs are huge!  I know some of you guys can handle a full rack, and I used to for sure!  But alas, weight watcher.  I am kind of looking the other way just using an 80 calorie sauce on a cut of meat that is already pushing the envelope!  Any last minute advice from the group would be great.  I am expecting only 3 to 4 hours at 225 on the AR raised grid indirect with a pan of water on the stone (on spacers) per meathead.  But I have read on here the 2-2-1 methods and others, so I don't know if it will require more time or not.  I am going to allow for about a 5 hour cook total and an hour or more in FTC until the guests arrive and were ready to eat.  I would time it to be taking them off the grill when they get here, but with the weather, probably no need in that.  Anyway, shoot away with the ideas.

I also made up the slaw mentioned above tonight, covered, and in the fridge.  And have the recipe handy, so here it is...
 

Sweet-Sour Slaw Recipe

Yield. 8 small servings
Prep time. 30 minutes
Let it sit. At least 1 hour in the fridge if possible

Ingredients for the dressing
1 tablespoon white sugar
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon celery seeds (not celery salt)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (corn oil or salad oil mix are good choices)
1/4 cup distilled white vinegar (not cider vinegar)

Ingredients for the slaw
1 pound green cabbage (about half a medium cabbage)
1 large carrot, peeled
1 small white onion
1/2 bell pepper, any color

Optional additions. Add 3 red radishes for a pinch of heat. Add white radishes if you like a jab of heat. Add a small jalapeño if you like a punch of heat. There are some jalapeno flecks in the picture above because that's the way I roll.

Method
1) In a bowl large enough for the whole shootin' match, whisk together the dressing. Don't skip the mustard. It's the secret ingredient that gives it life. And make sure all the lumps are whisked out.

2) Read my article on The Zen of Slawsome Slaw. Decide how you want to cut the cabbage, carrots, and onions: Chopped, grated, or hashed and have at it. I like this recipe best when chopped or grated. now that you've decided, do it.

3) Add the cabbage, carrots, and onions to the bowl with the dressing. Cover and chill for at least 1 hour if possible to extract the flavors from the celery seeds and the vegetables. They will give up some water, so don't worry if the mix seems a bit dry and strong at first. Mix it up occasionally so the dressing doesn't pool at the bottom and taste. You can now add more of the seasonings to your preference.

4) When you serve it, mix thoroughly and scoop from the bottom so the veggies have dressing on them.


And I will do the beans tomorrow during the cook.  The beans start with canned pintos, so don't flame me, I didn't want to smoke everything in the DO and still try to do the ribs.  But if this recipe isn't what it was cracked up to be, I will be looking for another.  I did applewood smoke the bacon the other day, so at least I am one step ahead on that.  Anyway, here is that recipe too...


Lupe Tortilla’s Charro Beans


4 slices bacon

2 jalapenos, seeded and diced

1 small onion, diced

2 16-oz cans pinto beans

1 large tomato, diced

2 teaspoons chopped cilantro

 

In a medium saucepan, warm beans and the juice from the can. Meanwhile, in a small frying pan, saute bacon, jalapeno and onion until well browned. Remove bacon from pan and cool on paper towels; add bacon grease, jalapeno, and onion to beans. Add tomatoes. Once bacon is cool enough to touch, break into small pieces and add to beans. Bring to a boil, then add cilantro. Lower heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

 

Optional…add 4 cloves of minced garlic, 1 teaspoon ground cumin, 3/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano, 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, 1 teaspoon salt, and substitute 1 Anneheim pepper for the Jalepeno peppers. Also 4 drops Wright’s Liquid Smoke.


Pics to follow tomorrow!

Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.

Comments

  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    Man...I was hoping a few of you experienced rib masters would have interjected a little.  I am holding now at 2:15 into the cook and at 32 degrees outside with freezing drizzle, the egg is holding pretty good at 225.  I thought about increasing to hotter, especially when I read more or watch Tom's video for the extender on the AR rig, he was doing his at 275.  So I hope they get done! 
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,940
    At 225, I'd think you're looking at closer to 5 hours than 3-4 hours. What time did you need them done by?
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs, Humphrey's Weekender, Superior Smokers SS-Two, MAK 1-Star General, Hasty Bake Gourmet, Santa Maria Grill, UDS (Darth Maul), Thai Charcoal cooker, Webers: 18.5" WSM, 22.5" OTG, 22.5" Kettle Premium, WGA Charcoal, Summit S-620 NG

    Bay Area, CA
  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    I have plenty of time really.  I need them done by maybe 5 to spend at least an hour in the FTC.  But really, just a 30 minute rest would be ok if I had to push it right?  I checked temps at the 2.5 hr mark and was at about 160 IT between bones in the thickest parts on all racks.  A few pics as promised!

    imageimage
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    Here is my setup...31 degrees outside now and cold rain...had to rig the umbrella!
    image
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,940
    A 30 min rest for ribs is fine. The ribs look pretty meaty. If I were cooking, I'd bump that temp up to 250.
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs, Humphrey's Weekender, Superior Smokers SS-Two, MAK 1-Star General, Hasty Bake Gourmet, Santa Maria Grill, UDS (Darth Maul), Thai Charcoal cooker, Webers: 18.5" WSM, 22.5" OTG, 22.5" Kettle Premium, WGA Charcoal, Summit S-620 NG

    Bay Area, CA
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,171
    R2Egg2Q said:
    A 30 min rest for ribs is fine. The ribs look pretty meaty. If I were cooking, I'd bump that temp up to 250.
    I agree with John, get the temp. up.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 9,820
    edited November 2013
    +1 more...I would bump the temp up a bit.  Just make sure they pass the bend test (step 9) before you take them off.  If you get in a hurry, you can always employ the crutch (step 8) and they will cook faster. 

    The recipes all sound great.  I'm sure you are in for quite a meal!  Best of luck.  


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    Ok...trouble in river city.  I have no clue why the temp dropped off, but it did.  I went to shower and cut my hair, came back and it was hovering around 200 with way open dampers because I opened them to recover faster after I glazed them.  They were at 185 IT when glazed, then less than an hour later the IT was 174!!!  So I pulled them rather than reload the lump that was still glowing but apparently blocked somehow.  Foiled them on cookie sheets and put in the oven at 250 for an hour, but checked IT at 40 minutes and has fallen farther!  So I upped the oven to 350 and will go another 30-60 minutes I guess, checking every 30 min with the thermapen, which is calibrated.  What a bummer.  Guess the wet rain and opening several times killed it.  I was careful to reopen dome and lower damper after I opened it and close down as it rose to my 250.  I did up it to 250 but hadn't seen you guys had recommended it.  It is now 6:13pm...
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 9,820
    IT can be difficult to read with ribs.  Use the bend test and/or test with a toothpick (should slide in and out easily).  Also the ribs pulling back from the bone is a good indicator.  

    They will cook faster foiled and they might be more done than you think.  Good luck!


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • KennyLeeKennyLee Posts: 764
    I wish I'd have seen this earlier.  In my opinion 225* is way too low for five hours, much less three or four.  My go-to has been 2-1-2 for a solid five hours at 260-280*

    LBGE

    Cedar table w/granite top

    Ceramic Grillworks two-tier swing rack

    Perpetual cooler of ice-cold beer

  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    Well, alls well that ends well. They were amazing, both dry rub only, and glazed. The beans and cole slaw too. I foiled and out in the oven only because the egg temp dropped after 4 hours. But the 1 hour in the oven was at 350 after my wife counseled me on it. They were right at 195 and literally pull off the bone. I had to be careful with one of the racks...it wanted to break picking it up, but the other three passed the bend test perfectly.
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,940
    Glad it ended well. Nice recovery. As for the Egg temp dropping after only 4 hrs of cooking, did you not load enough lump or maybe the holes in the charcoal grate were clogged with ash and bits of lump?
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs, Humphrey's Weekender, Superior Smokers SS-Two, MAK 1-Star General, Hasty Bake Gourmet, Santa Maria Grill, UDS (Darth Maul), Thai Charcoal cooker, Webers: 18.5" WSM, 22.5" OTG, 22.5" Kettle Premium, WGA Charcoal, Summit S-620 NG

    Bay Area, CA
  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153

    R2Egg2Q said:
    Glad it ended well. Nice recovery. As for the Egg temp dropping after only 4 hrs of cooking, did you not load enough lump or maybe the holes in the charcoal grate were clogged with ash and bits of lump?
    I thought about that too...but every cook so far, I have used the ash tool to stir the leftover lump, exposing the fire grate holes completely and sending any ash into the ash pit.  Then I scrape out the ash pit...and I had done that prior to the cook.  So I don't think it even could have been a draft issue.  I also loaded to the top of the fire ring with fresh Rockwood lump on top of the remaining rockwood from the previous cook.  The fact that it lit, rose, and maintained 225-250 through 4 hours just stumps me, to then go out.  I would have pulled the AR, both grids of ribs, and indirect oval stone right out of the egg and set it on the table while I just loaded somemore lump and relit it, waited for it to get to temp, and continued...I didn't have the time, and I also couldn't combat the outside temperature, as it was 31 degrees and freezing drizzle.  It was under the umbrella and dry over the top vent of the egg too, and I had the daisy wheel positioned so open/close would not reposition it.  In the infamous words of Sir John Hammond, in Jurassic Park, "all precautions were taken, spared no expense"...another rib pic on the platter!
    image
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • Sounds like you prepped the egg and lump correctly. Even after all that, it is possible that the grate holes can get clogged by small pieces of lump getting caught in the holes. I made and use a "wiggle Stick" where I can unplug the holes at run time. It has saved me from a choked fire more than once. Naked whiz has some for sell (or is it third eye ). Any way google bge wiggle stick and you can see them. I made mine for about $2.
    Simi Valley, California
    LBGE, PBC, Annova, SMOBot
  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    It was just out of lump mostly.  The edged of the ring had minimal lump left, but the center was completely void over the fire grate and the holes were clear.  I guess battling 31 degrees with wind and rain having opened to rotate the grids, crutch, and finally unwrap and glaze, took its toll on how much lump it consumed to do all that.  Everytime it was opened, I had 31 degrees chilling the ribs/grate on the stainless table.  The wind would whip my attempts to wrap/unwrap with foil, so they were out of the egg long enough to cool down each time.  Recovering from that and a slow rise back to cooking temp had to be tough.  It was!  Used a full load of lump in less than 5 hours! 
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
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