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anyone ever dry-age at home?

So after watching more Youtube videos than most people could stand on dry-aging I decided to try.  I'm doing the go lb. salt method, as it seems the easiest.  The general idea I got was don't over-complicate it and enjoy the results.  I bought a 10 1/2 pound strip loin and planned on going 30 days.  Got the fridge temp dialed in at 37 degrees on the nose.  Anyone have any horror stories to share.  Keep in mind I started in an impeccably clean dedicated fridge.  Thanks in advance for any comments, both good or bad.

Comments

  • LitLit Posts: 5,658
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  • I've gone over a hundred days with a not so impeccably clean fridge who's main purpose in life is to keep beer cold.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 230
    Thanks LS.  I'm really looking forward to it.  Dry-aged steaks in my area are 25.00 a pound and I was able to get the whole strip for 4.99 per pound.  Even if I lose 20% to evaporation and trim, I'm money way ahead.  Can't stress enough how much I want to hear potential horror stories. 
  • I did it with a 12 pound strip loin for 21 days with no trouble. I did mount a small fan inside the fridge for circulation plus I tried to keep the temp between 33-35 degrees. Good luck. Keep us posted on the results. 
    San Angelo, texas
  • 55drum55drum Posts: 130
    GL with your attempt.....I tried a standing rib for 30 days.....was not impressed...hardly any juices ...
  • jerryp said:
    Thanks LS.  I'm really looking forward to it.  Dry-aged steaks in my area are 25.00 a pound and I was able to get the whole strip for 4.99 per pound.  Even if I lose 20% to evaporation and trim, I'm money way ahead.  Can't stress enough how much I want to hear potential horror stories. 
    It's pretty straightforward. From the talk on the forums a few years back 45 days seemed to be the optimum time.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • RRPRRP Posts: 18,683
    I dry age all the time at home. I'm in the camp that prefers to use a product called a Drybag. Whether you go commando, salt or Drybag my personal opinion is any thing under 28 days is a waste of time. I prefer 35 days for thinner sub-primals like New York strip and 45 days for thicker cuts like rib eyes and sirloins. 
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 230
    RRP said:
    I dry age all the time at home. I'm in the camp that prefers to use a product called a Drybag. Whether you go commando, salt or Drybag my personal opinion is any thing under 28 days is a waste of time. I prefer 35 days for thinner sub-primals like New York strip and 45 days for thicker cuts like rib eyes and sirloins. 
    The inspiration for me way a steak I paid 50 bucks for at a local fine dining restaurant.  It was aged 29 days and was exquisite.  I love a RARE steak, so I can't imagine loss of juiciness will be an issue for me.  Thanks for the tips.  By the way, I plan on going to 30 days for the first attempt.  If it's a success, I'll get a bit braver with the time.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 18,683
    edited November 2013
    jerryp said:
    RRP said:
    I dry age all the time at home. I'm in the camp that prefers to use a product called a Drybag. Whether you go commando, salt or Drybag my personal opinion is any thing under 28 days is a waste of time. I prefer 35 days for thinner sub-primals like New York strip and 45 days for thicker cuts like rib eyes and sirloins. 
    The inspiration for me way a steak I paid 50 bucks for at a local fine dining restaurant.  It was aged 29 days and was exquisite.  I love a RARE steak, so I can't imagine loss of juiciness will be an issue for me.  Thanks for the tips.  By the way, I plan on going to 30 days for the first attempt.  If it's a success, I'll get a bit braver with the time.

    Please don't take this wrong but that $50 steak probably started out as prime to begin with. At the good price you paid for your meat for this aging attempt I kinda doubt it was prime. Just the same you should see some difference after 30 days so I wish you well. I'm just speaking from personal trial and error that shorter periods don't work for me. BTW the moisture lost in the aging process is just tasteless water anyway.
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • Ron is right about the grade of the meat you start with. If you were able to get it at five bucks a pound it is not likely prime. However, you will see a huge improvement in flavour even if it is choice or select. Aging further won't cause any loss in juice either....as he said it's just water that would come out in the cooking process anyway.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you that I used choice meat instead of select. It was from Sam's and I think I remember it was around 7 dollars a pound. Prime meat is way out of my means.
    San Angelo, texas
  • CP92CP92 Posts: 209

    Please don't take this wrong but that $50 steak probably started out as prime to begin with. At the good price you paid for your meat for this aging attempt I kinda doubt it was prime. Just the same you should see some difference after 30 days so I wish you well. I'm just speaking from personal trial and error that shorter periods don't work for me. BTW the moisture lost in the aging process is just tasteless water anyway.
      Ron is the man when it comes to dry aging.  But, you can find prime for relatively cheap at some Costcos.  This spring/summer I was getting primals for ~$8.50 and it's only at $10ish right now. But, let's not get into the all prime is not created equal discussion.
    Chris
    LBGE
    Laurel, MD
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 230
    I should've stated that it was definitely choice.  I knew I wouldn't be able to emulate a prime dry-aged.  I have, however, eaten several of them and an just curious if I can vastly improve an average steak.
  • It will be better than a non aged prime. Choice is second best isn't it?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Yes, it will definately improve an average steak.
    San Angelo, texas
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 230
    I would be doing my local grocer/butcher a disservice if I didn't mention that their beef, though choice grade, is awesome.  Benefit of a small, family owned grocery store.
  • How is the dry aging going?
    San Angelo, texas
  • RRPRRP Posts: 18,683
    edited November 2013
    The secret to dry aging at home is patience. It is a true hurry up and wait process. Then once you get hooked the next key point is keeping something aging all the time. It took me nearly a year to build up a decent inventory of aged steaks for my freezer since there is a constant reduction as well!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • Today I bought a 17 lb ribeye strip cut from Sams Club. It goes into a small refrigerator tommrow that I have modified for dry aging. Wish me luck!
    San Angelo, texas
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 3,688
    Good luck.   Let us know how it goes.

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • RRPRRP Posts: 18,683
    edited December 2013
    Today I bought a 17 lb ribeye strip cut from Sams Club. It goes into a small refrigerator tommrow that I have modified for dry aging. Wish me luck!

    When you say small refrigerator are you meaning one of those small dormitory size units? I hope not as those typically just cool without circulating the air. Circulation lets the moisture being released evaporate or be removed. Good luck!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • Yes it is a dormitory size but I have a fan running inside of it to circulate the air.
    San Angelo, texas
  • Well, I dry aged my 17lb ribeye strip for 28 days and it turned out fantastic! It was pricey to begin (choice grade) with plus it shrank during the drying process. Then there is the trimming of the dry crust, but man what a good steak! I will be doing this at least two times a year as I can afford it.
    San Angelo, texas
  • jls9595jls9595 Posts: 1,509
    after aging and cutting into individual steaks I assume you can foodsaver the extras and freeze?
    In Manchester, TN
    Vol For Life!
  • Yep. treat them just like any other steak.
    San Angelo, texas
  • How is the smell while its dry aging in the small fridge?  Is it something I would want to do in my apartment with a second small fridge, or would the smell be too much to live with?
    Chicago, Illinois
  • RRPRRP Posts: 18,683
    How is the smell while its dry aging in the small fridge?  Is it something I would want to do in my apartment with a second small fridge, or would the smell be too much to live with?
    no problem - I age my meat in our kitchen ref rig on the bottom shelf. Aging is the evaporation of the moisture in the meat not rotting meat!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • There is a slightly metallic smell but it is nothing like rotting meat

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • I would describe it as a slightly sour or yeasty smell. But defiantly not a rotting smell. The only time you will notice it is when the fridge door is open. Other than that you will not have any problem.
    San Angelo, texas
  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,825
    I just put a ribeye roast in the fridge to be eaten on February 3rd. My first attempt at dry aging for more than a few days.
    XL,L,S 
    Winston-Salem, NC 
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