Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope you all got to celebrate those tasty food holidays last week, we sure enjoyed them! We are even more excited about the beginning of fall, for so many reasons, but mainly for experiencing the cool, crisp air while being outside cooking up the best recipes the season has to offer. We especially love these Beer Pork Tenderloin and Ground Beef Acorn Squash recipes! Fall is upon us, and it's a great time for getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Steak and Frites

One of my favorite restaurant meals is Steak and Frites, when done well. I travel a lot and have had many varieties, but always enjoy when it's a Flat Iron Steak or NY Strip (both of which I can nail on the Egg) along with shoestring fries. I have issues duplicating the shoestring fries at home. Any one able to successfully do shoestring fries - on or off the Egg?
__________________________________________
It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
- Camp Hill, PA

Comments

  • radamoradamo Posts: 328
    Best way I have found to do homemade fries, shoestring or other is to slice and then soak in ice cold water for at least a few hours.  Then dry thoroughly before cooking.  I do them in deep fryer and usually with a two stage process.  

    Using Peanut (if I have it) or Canola Oil I do the first fry is at about 325 until they soften and get like a blond color.  Then scoop onto paper towels to dry.  Then a few minutes (at least 10 so they cool fully) later they go into 375 degree oil.  A few minutes is all they need and then back onto paper towels or a brown bag with some sea salt and sometimes a bit of fresh Thyme.  

    I believe this is based on Emeril's method.   
    Long Island, NY
  • @radamo uses the same technique I do, except I use 350ยบ for both the initial and the finishing fry. Must try the two temp method. In my 1 gallon fryer, I use Canola, it is about 5 to 7 minutes for the initial cook, <10 minute rest and three minute final fry. 
    Another use for my gasser, I use it for the cooling spot between fries. Throw a piece of foil on the grid, poke some drain holes in the foil, and dump the fires onto the foil. Any mess is easily burned off next time the grill is fired up. 

    I have tried dusting the resting fries with some seasoned flour with mixed results. They do crisp much better with the flour dust if I get it right, my problem has been getting clumps of flour.  
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • radamoradamo Posts: 328
    I never tried @skiddymarkers flour technique but I really like the gasser fry drain idea!  Might have to give that a go.  Love this forum.

    Long Island, NY
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 2,999
    Thanks guys.  I'll have to try the double fry.
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 760
    @Skiddymarker, use a sifter that you gently knock or a small sieve to apply the flour. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • jlsm said:
    @Skiddymarker, use a sifter that you gently knock or a small sieve to apply the flour. 
    Thanks, we think alike. I use a PC duster which works well, my problem is the fries that are touching each other tend to "flour weld" into one piece. I guess the answer might be to keep them spread out. Thanks for the suggestion. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
Sign In or Register to comment.