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Mustard?

Doing two 7.5 pork butts the w/e should I put mustard on it before the rub or will the rub stick ok on its own??
Rubbing tonight to be cooked late tomorrow for an over-nighter....is this ok?

My plan is on at midnight fri off at noon the next day,doing indirect at 250.

thanks.
Hows ya gettin' on, me ol cock



Kippens.Newfoundland and Labrador. (Canada).

Comments

  • CowdogsCowdogs Posts: 469
    It will be fine to rub pork butts 24 hours in advance.  I would not do ribs or smaller cuts of meat this far in advance, but the pork butts are fine.

    If you are curious, try one with mustard, and one without.  After they are cooked, I have found there to be little difference, if any.
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,116
    edited August 2013
    I know a lot of peeps slather with mustard, but I've been rubbing my pork and beef with worcestershire before seasoning and get that umami thing going on. Give it a try.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • CANMAN1976CANMAN1976 Posts: 1,489
    Thanks for the feedback and I do love worceshershire so may try this!!!
    Hows ya gettin' on, me ol cock



    Kippens.Newfoundland and Labrador. (Canada).
  • GreenhawKGreenhawK Posts: 398
    I have used Worcestershire with good results.

    I really like to spray with Pam cooking spray or a spray Olive Oil, and then put the rub on.  This makes an excellent paste that sticks to the meat with very little falling off and wasted.  I do this with ribs as well.
    Large BGE

    Decatur, AL
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273
    Cowdogs said:
    It will be fine to rub pork butts 24 hours in advance.  I would not do ribs or smaller cuts of meat this far in advance, but the pork butts are fine.

    If you are curious, try one with mustard, and one without.  After they are cooked, I have found there to be little difference, if any.

    In my opinion Mustard only impacts the amount of Rub that you can get to stick on the meat.  

    Doing one with Mustard and one without Mustard with an equal amount of Rub should yield the same results.   Since mustard doesn't impact taste - its a meaningless test.

    For me, the benefit of the mustard is loading the rub, getting it to stick and hold and amount for bark formation from the additional rub.

    Cookin in Texas
  • JwgreDeuxJwgreDeux Posts: 139
    I use mustard and notice two improvements over using olive oil:

    1.  Get more rub to stick to the butts, with less falling off during handling on/off egg

    2. Better looking color/bark.  Not sure is this is the mustard or the fact that there is more rub, but they seem to look better vs when I use oil.

    One thing to keep in mind, there are certain spices used in various rubs that actually break down better with some kind of oil (not water) so it may also depend on your rub.
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,287
    I find the rub sticks to the naked butts just fine.  Good bark too.  I use a pretty standard rub with sugar, paprika, cumin, kosher salt, pepper, etc.
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    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,013
    Best thing about mustard is letting the help do the job. Wooster is great, but when we have some soon to be beyond its best by date mustard in the fridge, Grandson gets to slather it on. 
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    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    To each there own.   I think there was Mustard debate about this time last year.

    Rub's will stick without mustard.   I just believe more will stick longer with Mustard.   I am probably in the minority in that Mrs. Boatbum has this "thing" about bark.  Happy wife, happy life.

    So I trim all the external fat I can get off, coat with mustard, use an extreme amount rub, sometimes do a little sugar of somekind on top of the rub as an external binder and cook away.

    Just me ....

     

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    Cookin in Texas
  • jaydub58jaydub58 Posts: 1,285

    Cookinbob, that is cool use of the flower pots for the raised grill.  Good looking way to increase cooking capacity.

     

    :-c
    John in the Willamette Valley of Oregon
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    LBGE & SBGE (big momma and pat)
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 15,008
    Have always rub then mustard and rub once more. Now going to try the Worcestershire next.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, just added a Mini Max 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015 http://saladoeggheadgathering.blogspot.com

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 15,008
    Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

    Why am I not surprised? Damn I missed you till you started showing back up...... Kidding....kidding :x
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, just added a Mini Max 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015 http://saladoeggheadgathering.blogspot.com

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273
    Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos
    I guess the thermapen probe will slide right in.  Always heard its gotta be easy to poke.
    Cookin in Texas
  • beteezbeteez Posts: 296
    A mixture of Mustard & Worcestershire then rub
  • StlScottStlScott Posts: 77

    I know a little bit about mustard...

    It's just a binding agent - acting a lot like an emulsifier does when you have an oil and vinegar dressing.  Without it, those two items sit together, but always remain separate.  With the mustard, more of the rub stays on ... especially if you are prone to moving the cut of meat with a fork, tongs, etc. 

    The trick with mustard always was that it had to be the plain, yellow stuff ... and nothing fancy.  Dijon or whole grain did not do the trick.  Have no idea why...  It's also not something that is supposed to impart any flavor into the meat, which is something that other binding agents do not do.

    The individual that shared it with me also suggested that the vinegar in the mustard helped to do something with the bark, but I've never seen any difference there. 

    Regardless, it's something that's been around for a long, long time.  If you find something that works equally as well - go for it and share the results!  Always love learning new tricks. 

    StlScott

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