Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
It’s almost football season, so we’re perfecting our favorite tailgating and homegating recipes! Whether you like hamburgers, wings, brats, ribs or something cooked with beer, we have everything you’ll need for the perfect tailgate party. We always like inviting friends to join our tailgates because the EGG is about community and having fun, so make sure if you’re inviting company you make extra - the food will be gone before you know it! Don't forget dessert, either!

Big Green Egg headquarters has moved - come visit our new showroom and check out the museum and culinary center too! 3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340

Bonesless baby back ribs?

Anyone ever tried? The wife brought them home from sams club, and after the reaction my wife expected, I have to cook them. Anyone messed with them? Still low and slow? No way it can take as long as normal slabs. She wants me to cook them today.



"Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

Comments

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 14,670
    McRib? =))
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    HAHA, I know! You could only imagine the look on my face when she gave them to me. It is litterally a rack of ribs, with the bones pulled out.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,542
    I guess they'll cook slightly faster but they still have all the connective tissue so I'd treat them the same temp-wise.
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    Right, I am thinking a little higher than normal. More like 275-300 indirect for about 1.5 hours.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 6,884
    Time for the good 'ol toothpick test to determine when finished...
    Louisville   L & S BGEs 
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    right... I guess internal temp will be a little easier. 140?



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    You know, not needing to worry about touching the bones, should get a good reading.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,483
    i think those would work really well with a red pork char sui type recipe
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 6,884
    I think 140*F is too low-never have checked the temp on ribs (always go by feel) but I'm guessing you would have to figure about the same as pulled pork...just an opinion.  Let us know how this goes.
    Louisville   L & S BGEs 
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    I am going to go by feel. Will let y'all know.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,620
    A market near me has sold "boneless baby back ribs" every now and then for years. I'm not certain, but I think it just the muscle on the small side of what's being called a pork t-bone.Some connective tissue, not much fat. Doesn't  demand lo-n-slo. I like to marinade them, and cook around 300 indirect, and then a few minutes beyond the heat deflector to add some browning.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,483
    gdenby said:
    A market near me has sold "boneless baby back ribs" every now and then for years. I'm not certain, but I think it just the muscle on the small side of what's being called a pork t-bone.Some connective tissue, not much fat. Doesn't  demand lo-n-slo. I like to marinade them, and cook around 300 indirect, and then a few minutes beyond the heat deflector to add some browning.
    theres also the section on the country loin end of the loin that usually gets ground up between the tiny loin section and rib, it can take higher heats as well, its the only section i can see that might be called boneless babyback , ive cooked those at 325, there can be a fat type cap on that section

  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    These look like a real slab of ribs. There is cuts where each bone would be and it appears they simply removed the membrane and sliced out the bones. Here are a few pics.

    image
    image
    image
    image

    image



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,620
    Those look very much like what I find for sale, but somewhat larger. What I've had has no evidence of the bones. Just a clean cut layer of meat.

    But, I think I've learned something. I don't now think its the muscle from the small side of the t-bone, which would be the tenderloin. Rather,  the muscle that overlays the "tail" of the chop. The "tail" being the back ribs when separated from the spine, loin and spares.

    At any rate, they cook much more like a piece of chop than spares.
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    I wonder why these would have the cuts half if not more than half way through the meat? I really want to say that these are literally a slab with the membrane removed, and the bones sliced out. We will see soon, they are on the egg now and at 170* internal.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 2,902
    A lot of places here sell boneless country style ribs with cuts in them like you describe. I've always marinated or sauced and cooked them like chops and eat with a fork and knife.

    ___________________________________

     

     LBGE,SBGE, and a mini makes three......Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    If you got it - cook it.

    Not sure I would pick it up in the store though, would have to read some really good results on here.   I think cooking anything with the bone add's a lot of flavor.  Would have to be sold on the idea of boneless.

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    What good are ribs without the bones?  If it aint broke, don't fix it!

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,299
    So after cooking as if they were baby back ribs, I found that they were dry, they reminded me more of a country style rib. Actually more like a freaking pork chop. I have already had an intervention with my wife and she understands what she did wrong LOL. No, she just thought "hey, I like boneless chicken breast more than regular so.." Even being the wife of a BBQ guy, she still wanted to push the buck. She now agrees with what we all know, ribs need a bone.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 774
    Anyone ever tried? The wife brought them home from sams club, and after the reaction my wife expected, I have to cook them. Anyone messed with them? Still low and slow? No way it can take as long as normal slabs. She wants me to cook them today.
    Isn't boneless ribs an oxymoron? It's like saying "hamburger steak, convertible hardtop, military intelligence"
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • SteveWPBFLSteveWPBFL Posts: 1,284
    Boneless ribs. I'm back to the tree falling in the forest with no one around and what noise does it make. Can it even happen?

    Seems like you could have cooked them like a tenderloin, put on a rub then raised direct at 300 - 400 until IT is 140F. Seems like 10-20 minutes depending on thickness. Worth another shot.


Sign In or Register to comment.