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Hunk of Cow

GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072

Hi everyone,

I have a 10 pound New York Strip and I am planning on cooking it whole, any thoughts.

I have cooked several like this on my gasser cooking direct at 350 and they always turn out great so the pressure is on to pull off a winner on the egg.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Comments

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,352
    If you were happy with the result on a gasser the egg is only going to make it better. You might want to drop the temp to 325. I always find that since the egg is a convection cooker you are safer to use a bit lower temp. You could cook at 250* with an end sear as well.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,583
    If you are cooking direct, an Egg is hotter than most gassers. Most of the heat is being put out in IR, which cooks more effectively than hot gasses. As @LittleSteven says, 325. And because the IR effect becomes much stronger w. distance, cooking at the felt level should reduce the chance of burnt spots. At the fire ring level, the temp will be closer to 600.
  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 1,464
    Check out www.amazingribs.com- they have a great prime rib/rib roast recipe I have used before and it turned out really great. Good luck and let us know how it works out for you
    Greensboro, NC
  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072

    Thanks for your early replies, I am undecided on cooking it direct or not, that's just the way I have done them in the past on my gas grill. I need to have it ready by 5:30 so I have some time before I start cooking and will be checking back often.

    Thanks

  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 2,685
    Wolfpack said:
    Check out www.amazingribs.com- they have a great prime rib/rib roast recipe I have used before and it turned out really great. Good luck and let us know how it works out for you

    + 1.  Trust us.

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072

    I just read the method on www.amazingribs.com Thanks for the info Wolfpack and Foghorn.

    I'm giving this a try today, should I do platesetter legs up drip pan and grill grate? I was thinking of getting dome temp settled in at 250

    My family loves the food I have made on the egg.

     

  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 1,464
    Yes- just make sure you have an air gap between the drip pan and plate setter. Some tin foil balls do the trick for me. Yes dome of 250-275.
    Greensboro, NC
  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072

    Thanks Wolfpack, I am new to the egg world what's the need for the air gap.

    Thanks

  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 2,685

    Drip pan is optional.  By "grill grate" I assume you mean the standard BGE grate?  Or are you talking about a GrillGrate?

    http://www.grillgrate.com/

    It probably shouldn't matter either way if you keep the temp low - but I'd go with the standard grate.

    The only other thing to watch out for is to remember that it is always OK to end the low temp part of the cook early (at say 105-110) because it will rise another 5 - 10 degrees after you take if off.  But if you end it late you'll overcook your meat when you do the sear (even if you do it in an effort to achieve perfection - don't ask me how I know)

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072

    Hey Foghorn, yes standard BGE grate, the only reason I was considering the drip pan was for easy clean up.

    Thanks for replying!

  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 1,464
    I usually do a drip pan because you can get a burnt smell/taste from fat burning on the plate setter. The air gap prevents the same thing happening in your drip pan
    Greensboro, NC
  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072
    Well that's done, in fact it was a little over done. I thought it would take me 3 to 4 hours indirect 250 dome and I was off by a hour and a half, I checked it about 75 minutes into the cook and it was already at 120 so I pulled it and foiled it then put it back on a hour later direct at 500 for 5 minutes a side and pulled it at 140 and it went to 150 med. I have a lot to learn, it tasted good but I'm a rare guy.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,352

    If you were really at 250* it should have looked rare regardless of the temp. This was cooked to 140* intentionally.

    DSC_0008-2 photo DSC_0008-2-1.jpg

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072

    Hey Little Steven,

     I bounced around 250/275 Dome and I have checked my thermometer and believe it's correct. It was a weird shaped strip (very thin) it looked more like slab bacon in size, the thickest part was around 2 and 1/2 to 3 inches thick. It sure didn't look like your picture, you win. I'm learning.

    Thanks for your input, I will be back at it this weekend.

    Chuck

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,352
    edited May 2013
    I'm sorry! I had forgotten that you had a strip loin. I guess because you were getting recipe responses for rib roasts. Still, it should have looked a little more red throughout.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,352
    I just re-read your post. You said you foiled it. Was that loosely tented or wrapped up?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072
    Tented on a cutting board, Our meal was planned for another 90 minutes and I thought that would be the best way to hold it till I put it back on the grill for a quick sear and reheat.
  • bccomstockbccomstock Posts: 336
    Could you have cut the 500 degree sear time down to a minute or 2 per side?  That's typically what I do when reverse searing something.. That might have kept you in the 125 - 130 range.
    LBGE
    MS Gulf Coast - Proud member of the Who Dat Nation!
    My Not Frequently Updated Blog: http://datcue.wordpress.com
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,352
    Tented on a cutting board, Our meal was planned for another 90 minutes and I thought that would be the best way to hold it till I put it back on the grill for a quick sear and reheat.
    I'm betting the double heat/rest cycle is what drove your temps up. You cooked to 120* carryover cooked to 130* reheated to 140* and carryover cooked to 150*. If you had pulled the meat at say 115*, knocked the vents open and 5 minutes later and seared you would have only had one carryover of about 10* so you would have finished around 135*

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • GrillmagicGrillmagic Posts: 1,072
    Thanks Little Steven, I think I messed up by holding it tented for over a hour waiting for our guests to arrive. I'm trying a 12 pound Turkey this weekend.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 7,155
    I think the other issue is the thickness of the meat. For rib roasts, I remove the bones and tie the roast to get it round. A 4 pound roast will cook in the same time as a 10 pound as the 10 pounder is just longer, not thicker. It is the thickness that counts. 
    If we only cooked meat shaped like a ball, cook time will increase linearly with weight and diameter. This does not work with non-sperical pieces.
    Strip loins are the hardest to get right in my opinion. The thickness can vary, but assuming it was only 2-3 inches, 60-90 minutes at 250 indirect would easily bring you to 115 internal. Hold and then sear. I think that;s what your experience proved. 
    Amazing Ribs also has a good explanation of thickness and cook time.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • pasoeggpasoegg Posts: 259

    If you were really at 250* it should have looked rare regardless of the temp. This was cooked to 140* intentionally.

     

    DSC_0008-2 photo DSC_0008-2-1.jpg

    i almost stuck a knife in the monitor....that really looks GOOD!

    "it is never too early to drink, but it may be too early to be seen drinking"

    Winston-Salem, NC

  • dlk7dlk7 Posts: 1,006

    Check this out for your turkey - It's awesome!!

    http://www.nakedwhiz.com/madmaxturkey.htm

     

    Two XL BGEs - So Happy!!!!

    Waunakee, WI

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