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pizza problem

Last night I cooked pizzas. I tried a new crust recipe out of a vitamix cookbook. The bottom of the pizzas burned badly. The setup and temp were the same I've used on the countless pizza cooks I've done. My go-to crust recipe doesn't call for sugar but I 've found it much chewier than I like the past few times using the caputo flour in the red bag. I wanted to try a new crust recipe so the one out of the vitamix cookbook sounded interesting. Could the addition of sugar make that much of a difference? Thanks.

Comments

  • mb99zzmb99zz Posts: 182
    That's interesting.  I wouldn't think sugar would cause that, but I'm no expert.  Was there excess flour on the dough from forming it and placing it on the peel? 
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 228
    mb99zz said:
    That's interesting.  I wouldn't think sugar would cause that, but I'm no expert.  Was there excess flour on the dough from forming it and placing it on the peel? 
    Nope. I always use corn meal. The only difference was the crust itself. The procedure and setup was all the same.
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 876
    Yes. The addition of sugar certainly could cause the burn. Also, does the new crust contain olive oil and the old not? That could cause it, too. 

    New York style, made to be baked in ovens of about 550, uses bread flour, yeast, water, salt, sugar and oil. Neapolitan style uses just 00 flour, yeast, water and salt; these you bake at 800+. Cold fermentation of at least 24 hours improves the taste of both.

    The sugar and oil stimulate the browning you get at very high temps. What temp was the egg? 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • BotchBotch Posts: 3,898
    What jlsm said.  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    You tried something new -- thats a good thing!  It didn't come out as well as your original dough - thats and bad thing!  But you still have your original dough recipe - thats a good thing!!!
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 228
    jlsm said:

    Yes. The addition of sugar certainly could cause the burn. Also, does the new crust contain olive oil and the old not? That could cause it, too. 


    New York style, made to be baked in ovens of about 550, uses bread flour, yeast, water, salt, sugar and oil. Neapolitan style uses just 00 flour, yeast, water and salt; these you bake at 800+. Cold fermentation of at least 24 hours improves the taste of both.

    The sugar and oil stimulate the browning you get at very high temps. What temp was the egg? 
    I always cook at 600 degrees. Plate setter legs down with pizza stone propped up on the ceramic feet.
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 228
    Here's a photo of the pie as I was preparing to pull it off.
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 876
    No other variables? Stone heating for longer? Must be the sugar, then. I always use sugar, though, and my pies haven't burned. Maybe the gods weren't with you that night. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 228
    I thought about it more and I remembered I did use a different corn meal. I cant imagine that making much of a difference.
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