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Raised Direct Clarification

I always considered "raised direct" to mean the main grill raised even with the felt line via woo, Adjustable rig, firebricks, bolts, etc.    I have seen several pictures where the grill is 2-3 inches above the felt line.  Is there a consensus to this term or is it all good?

Comments

  • YEMTreyYEMTrey Posts: 3,678
    From what I've read it depends on the type of food being cooked. In the chicken wing thread, some recommended going higher in the dome for crisper skin.
    XL and a Mini Max Egg in Cincinnati, Ohio
  • For me, raised grid can mean anything that is raised from the "normal" BGE grate. Typically my raised grid setup is adjustable rib with the its own grate sitting on the ceramic ring that the normal BGE grid would sit on, which raises the cooking surface to about 4" above the felt line I think.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."


  • YEMTrey said:
    From what I've read it depends on the type of food being cooked. In the chicken wing thread, some recommended going higher in the dome for crisper skin.
    The higher in the dome, the less burning on the bottom and the more even cooking all around typically.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • JeffM said:
    I always considered "raised direct" to mean the main grill raised even with the felt line via woo, Adjustable rig, firebricks, bolts, etc.    I have seen several pictures where the grill is 2-3 inches above the felt line.  Is there a consensus to this term or is it all good?
    Your first sentence describes what it is. You can extend to higher in the dome, you can lower to within an inch or so of the fire ring. Direct is the cooking grid sitting on the fire ring. Raised direct is placing the cooking grid at the same level (basically the felt line) as the cooking grid in an indirect platesetter set-up, without the setter. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 17,540
    edited February 2013

    I live with AR's in both my Larges. 80% of my cooks at some time or the other ends up a couple of inches over the the felt (and at time higher with adding the extender). To me raised = better control of the cook (in simple terms, don't burn near as much stuff)...... Most of my cooks are direct.

    .My Mini has the Mini Woo in it most always. I am thinking of having Tom do me another Mini Woo only higher.

    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, added a Mini Max (I'm good for now). 

  • Mickey said:

    I live with AR's in both my Larges. 80% of my cooks at some time or the other ends up a couple of inches over the the felt (and at time higher with adding the extender). To me raised = better control of the cook (in simple terms, don't burn near as much stuff)...... Most of my cooks are direct.

    .My Mini has the Mini Woo in it most always. I am thinking of having Tom do me another Mini Woo only higher.

    I haven't ordered my mini woo yet and I was considering going higher.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  If the lead bullets don't kill you, the leaded water will.

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