Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Here are some of our new favorite non-beef burgers: Italian Turkey Burger, Grilled Tuna Burger and Goat Cheese Portobello Burger. You’ll want to perfect these before football season starts up in a few weeks! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

thinking of wrapping my brisket. thoughts?

I was thinking of trying to wrap a brisket for the first time.  What internal temp should I reach before I wrap it? I have also always called it done at 195 internal. Does that change when you wrap them? Thanks.

Comments

  • rsmith193rsmith193 Posts: 219
    I wrap my flat at 170, and pull it from the egg at 198. Pour off the jucie into a cup, and loose wrap it in the cambro or empty ice chest for about 1 to 2 hours.
  • ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Welcome to the Swamp.....GO GATORS!!!!
  • mimaulermimauler Posts: 119
    I've always used the combo of temp and the fork test for a brisket it may say 195 or 200 but if it doesn't twist real easy with a fork then I let it go longer.
  • tnbarbqtnbarbq Posts: 248
    I wrap them.  I let them cook an hour or so wrapped in foil, then finish unwrapped to reset bark.  Keep the juices if you can.
    Scooter 
    Mid TN. Hangin' in the 'Boro. MIM Judge
  • I wrap at 165 and remove at 195-200, then rest. A good long rest of more than an hour is great. I leave the brisket in the foil, wrapped in a damp towel I heat up in the microwave and put it in a cooler. I personally do not add any moisture to the brisket when i wrap it, however I do inject them prior to the cook. There is tons of moisture in the brisket that has just started to break down at the 160-165 temp. When you unwrap and slice it will be bathing in its own juices rendered from the fat and connective tissue and injection in the brisket. I have no problem with the bark. By the time you reach 165 you should have a very well developed smoke ring and bark. The wrap just allows you to retain some or the moisture given off during the breakdown of the fat and connective tissue which doesn't occur til this point of the cook anyway.
  • tjvtjv Posts: 3,239
    only thing to add is if the bark is not set, you could loose the bark when foiling.  t
    www.ceramicgrillstore.com
    ACGP, Inc.
  • I think you should ask yourself why you are wrapping? What do you hope to achieve? Many good briskets are done wrapped but there are specific reasons to wrap. Wrapping does several things but mainly it speeds up the cook. When you wrap before the stall, it pushes through much more quickly. It also protects your brisket from higher heat cooks. Wrapping is more a product of competitions where you have 6 hours to turn in a 15lb brisket. They cook at 350 and crutch (wrap) to get the results they are after. at 350 you will get a very hard burnt bark unless you wrap once it darkens up. I don't wrap, but I know lots of guys that do and they are great. I cook a little lower (275 or so) and don't need to wrap. I do wrap after they are done and let them rest for a few hours. I have noticed better results from this hold period than wrapping to cook. I don't like the texture of crutched brisket when I do it so I avoid it. I did one last week and it was OK. I was in a hurry and it worked out. Not my best effort but I did a 12lb brisket in 6 hrs and the masses were happy.

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,851
    @C-T-I'm surprised you are still alive after that 12 in 6 hr cook.  Woulda thought the brisket gods had found you out and then taken care of that blasphemous cook.  Dang-12 in 6-gotta be a record-not that I would turn it down but nice to know you can get 'er done in that window!
    Louisville
  • 350 degrees. Wrapped when it hit 160. No stall.

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,851
    edited January 2013
    Okay-the friggin wrap...and as you note it has its place but I do like the measured pace of the no wrap cook.  Not to mention the adult supervisory beverage time. Thanks for the info.
    Louisville
  • CenTex - I'm right there with you! Wrapping brisket was never heard of until BBQ competitions. I run my briskets between 225-250 grate temp and 195 or so internal. I'm not trying to power through the stall ... to my mind the few briskets that were wrapped that I've tasted weren't nearly as tender as I like. I like all that fat rendered into the brisket! I pull at about 195 or so, wrap in heavy duty foil, then wrap in old beach towels, and place in a cooler for an hour. Then it sliced, served and enjoyed! I've never used the Texas Crutch method and really don't intend to use it.
  • CenTex - I'm right there with you! Wrapping brisket was never heard of until BBQ competitions. I run my briskets between 225-250 grate temp and 195 or so internal. I'm not trying to power through the stall ... to my mind the few briskets that were wrapped that I've tasted weren't nearly as tender as I like. I like all that fat rendered into the brisket! I pull at about 195 or so, wrap in heavy duty foil, then wrap in old beach towels, and place in a cooler for an hour. Then it sliced, served and enjoyed! I've never used the Texas Crutch method and really don't intend to use it.

    I've had plenty of good ones. Aaron Franklin and J. Mueller's both wrap in paper and they are the best i've ever had. I normally don't love the texture but those guys do it right.

  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 222
    I ended up wrapping it and it was by far the best brisket I've ever done. The family went nuts for it too. The bark softened a bit, but the flavor was still there. I also was much more careful selecting a brisket with a nice fat cap. Maybe wrapping helped, maybe not. I will try my next no wrap being careful to select another nice one from the grocery. Thanks for all the advice.
Sign In or Register to comment.