Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Breaking in a new egg

I just purchased a new BGE, my first and can't wait to begin using it.  Does is need a break in period?  If so, what does that look like?  I don't want to do anything to damage it as I have waited a long time to finally get one.  Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Comments

  • Congrats on the new egg!  Check the tightness of the band bolts after each cook for the first 3-4 cooks.  It is recommended to keep the first 3-4 cooks under 400 to season the gasket.  With that said a felt gasket will only last a short time for most but if you have the newer high temp gasket you will be good to go for awhile.  Have fun and enjoy. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    edited November 2012
    http://www.biggreenegg.com/getting-started/first-timer-tips/

    That's good info.  Most important to note, keep the temp below 350F on your first cooks - that's mostly to help cure the gasket adhesive.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • BENTEBENTE Posts: 8,337
    edited November 2012

    they dont really need a break in period. we used to tell people to keep your egg under 400 for the first dozen or so cooks. that was so the gasket would stick to the egg a little better. i am not sure if that is still the norm but for what it is worth i would do that if i got a new egg. but i would do it to be on the safe side. if i were you i would cook what you normally would cook on your old grill until you get the hang of keeping the temps like you want them. you know chicken, pork chops, burgers and that stuff.

     

    but that is my $.02 

    happy eggin

    TB

    Anderson S.C.

    "Life is too short to be diplomatic. A man's friends shouldn't mind what he does or says- and those who are not his friends, well, the hell with them. They don't count."

    Tyrus Raymond Cobb

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    They switched to Nomex recently as a gasket material, (unfortunately after I bought my egg).  The instructions that came with the Nomex I bought to replace the failed factory gasket said to keep it under 350F for the first cook.  So I'd at least follow that - better safe than sorry.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 10,374
    Just drink and enjoy...also, take out a second mortgage to pay your butcher. Welcome.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,171
    It does seem to me that the gasket adhesive needs a few cooks to harden.

    But first, do a "dollar" test. A piece of paper should not slide out easily when it is between the closed lid and the bottom gasket. If there is a gap, a high temp sear will melt both the classic felt gasket and the newer nomex at that place. If there is a space like that, most often the dome band needs to be loosened, the dome pushed down, and the band re-tightened.

    Don't start the lump w. lighter fluid. The petroleum fumes will get into the ceramic, and take some time to burn away.

    Otherwise, its just a matter of seasoning yourself. Eggs cook a lot differently than metal cookers, and that will take some getting used to if you have been using either gassers or metal charcoal cookers. And, they can get really hot. Spend some time watching how fast the temperature increases, especially when over 450F.


  • IMHO, The real reason to keep the egg below 400 on the first few cooks is to educate the cook with the egg and how it works. The gasket seal is important and checking/tightening the fasteners. 

    There is no harm in learning with a couple of direct/indirect 400 cooks. 


    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • YEMTreyYEMTrey Posts: 1,367
    henapple said:
    Just drink and enjoy...also, take out a second mortgage to pay your butcher. Welcome.
    :Truth:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    "Ain't nobody gonna find ya, unless you get yourself lost."
  • I do think you should build a fire and not cook at least once. The ceramic does give off a taste on the first cook. Experiment. Start a fire and keep it at 250 for an hour (while you drink) then take it up to 350 for an hour (keep drinking) play with the Daisey wheel and air gate and get a feel for how you adjust the temps. Try to take it back down to 250 and see how much harder it is to lower than raise. (You can keep drinking but don't get out of control you have a job to do).  This will season your egg and you'll be good to go. Hold on cause your in for an incredible adventure!
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    Don't ever have the dampers full open or top up and forget about it.  It doesn't take long before it's as hot as the sun.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Thanks to everyone for your help.  I fired it up and was able to (sort of) maintain temperatures at different levels as suggested.  It is much different from the gasser that I am used to.  Having fun, but a whole new learning curve.
    thanks again for your help

  • RACRAC Posts: 1,134
    Don't worry you will get it. It took me a few times!

    Ricky

    Spring, TX

  • DonWWDonWW Posts: 218
    Brad, it took me a few cooks to get the feel of the egg, setting temps, etc.  Start off simple with chickens, steaks, etc.  Try a pork shoulder for your first low and slow.  You will be hooked before you know it.  Welcome to the club!
    XL BGE.  Dallas, Texas.
  • Welcome to the forum Brad!  Make yourself at home.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • I do think you should build a fire and not cook at least once. The ceramic does give off a taste on the first cook. Experiment. Start a fire and keep it at 250 for an hour (while you drink) then take it up to 350 for an hour (keep drinking) play with the Daisey wheel and air gate and get a feel for how you adjust the temps. Try to take it back down to 250 and see how much harder it is to lower than raise. (You can keep drinking but don't get out of control you have a job to do).  This will season your egg and you'll be good to go. Hold on cause your in for an incredible adventure!
    I'm with Dawg. If you are new, a fire to experiment with is the way to go, no pressure on getting the food to come out right. And I agree that there is a bit of odor or taste on the first cook.
    LBGE
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