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Ponzu Sauce

I know there are at least a couple more sauceheads on the forum besides me, so I thought I'd post the recipe of a very good sauce I stumbled across.  It's Ponzu sauce (Japanese).  I think the combination of citrus juice, brown sugar, and Asian ingredients gives it a very interesting and great taste.  I used it as a dipping sauce for grilled shrimp (done on the Egg) and homemade dumplings.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons Light Soy Sauce

2 tablespoons Lime juice

2 tablespoons Orange juice

2 tablespoons Brown sugar

2 tablespoons Vegetable oil

1/2 teaspoon Sriracha

1 tablespoon Ginger, minced

1 clove  Garlic, minced

1/4 cup Basil, fresh, chopped

Directions:

Combine all ingredients


image


__________________________________________

Dripping Springs, Texas.
Just west of Austintatious


Comments

  • I'll be adding this to my cookbook. Sounds easy to make too. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • I'll be adding this to my cookbook. Sounds easy to make too. 
    You got a cookbook?
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • Not really. I got that app on my iMac. I imagine that once I get a lifetime worth of recipes I could have a few that others would like. Maybe I'll put them in a book then. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 18,611
    I'll be adding this to my cookbook. Sounds easy to make too. 
    You got a cookbook?

    He can read?
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, added a Mini Max (I'm good for now). 

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 18,611
    No I did not notice one pink shrimp.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, added a Mini Max (I'm good for now). 

  • Mickey said:
    No I did not notice one pink shrimp.
    I had to soak the others in bleach for a week to get the color out.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,620
    Sauce sounds good. I like how you played with the colors to get that picture to come out that way. Cool editing job.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • Sauce sounds great, now I want the dumpling recipe! One of them looks great the other two are a little grey for my taste
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • Sauce sounds great, now I want the dumpling recipe! One of them looks great the other two are a little grey for my taste
    Dawg,

    The dumplings are fun to make.  Here is a video on how to make them.

    You can also make shrimp dumplings.  Here is the link.  I don't put the dried shrimp in.  To me, they taste rotten.

    My wife is good at folding them, but I'm not, so I use a plastic pie/dumpling mold.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • bookmarked. Gracias 
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
    2 Large BGE &1 MiniMax BGE
    1- Large BGE
    1 Karubecue C60 (aka-"The Dishwasher")
    Roccbox-Blackstone 36
    More accessories than TFJ knows about and one more purchase from mandatory counciling
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 979
    VI, sounds fantastic. Even better than a traditional Ponzu:

    Ingredients
    • 2/3 cup fresh lemon juice, more to taste
    • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice, more to taste
    • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
    • 1 cup good-quality soy sauce
    • 1/4 cup mirin (or 1/4 cup sake and 1 tablespoon sugar)
    • 1 3-inch piece kelp (konbu)
    • 1/2 cup (about 1/4 ounce) dried bonito flakes
    • Pinch cayenne
    Method
    • In a bowl, combine all ingredients. Let sit for at least 2 hours or overnight. Strain. Just before using, you might add a small squeeze of fresh lemon or lime juice. Covered and refrigerated, ponzu will keep for at least several days.
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • VI, I'm gonna try those dumplings, guess I'll have to get a poodle!
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • Dawg,

    I really like the dipping sauce for dumplings that our favorite Asian Fusion restaurant has.  I bought a pint and took it home and reverse engineered it.  I must admit I got it, spot on.  I think next time I have dumplings, I'll have a bowl of Ponzu sauce and this dipping sauce.

    8 parts Soy Sauce
    2 parts Chili Oil
    4 parts Balsamic Vinegar
    1 part Lime juice


    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • jlsm,

    I saw that recipe and was a little leery of the kelp and bonita flakes, so I went with this one.  Sometimes, Asians like stuff I think tastes rotten, like small dried shrimp.  So, the bonita flakes scares me.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • +1 on the @jlsm recipe, the bonita makes the ponzu (the ponzu I know) Japanese friend showed us. Will have to try VI's recipe. 

    Our Taiwanese friends make dumplings very similar, but they boil them rather than fry. It is all good. Although fun to make, it can be time consuming. Costco has some fresh pack gyoza that work in a pinch. 
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
  • jlsm,

    I saw that recipe and was a little leery of the kelp and bonita flakes, so I went with this one.  Sometimes, Asians like stuff I think tastes rotten, like small dried shrimp.  So, the bonita flakes scares me.
    Bonita flakes are sick. They look like a tuna but taste like sewer rat. Your trepidation is right on the money. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • Skiddy,
    I also boil them, sorta.  As shown in the video, brush the pan with sesame oil so they don't stick, then add enough water to cover about half way up the dumpling.  Then cover and steam them until the water is gone.  Add a little sesame oil, then cook another minute.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 25,462
    edited November 2012
    Kombu and bonito are the base ingredients for dashi - which is a base stock used for lots of stuff - basically the Japanese version of chicken broth.  Those clear soups you get with just a few noodles in them at sushi joints are dashi.  They also add it to miso.

    I like it - I wouldn't munch on bonito flakes (I must admit my cats go nuts over bonito).  You make the broth by seeping like a tea and discard the flakes and seaweed. Kombu is good in soup and salad.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Skiddy,
    I also boil them, sorta.  As shown in the video, brush the pan with sesame oil so they don't stick, then add enough water to cover about half way up the dumpling.  Then cover and steam them until the water is gone.  Add a little sesame oil, then cook another minute.
    "Taiwanese" dumplings are very similar to your gyoza, except the onion is a scallion (green onion), no white or yellow onion, and very little garlic. Base is cabbage and pork.
    Once the dumplings are made, boil water (like for pasta) drop them in. Let the water return to a boil, add enough cold water to stop the boil and then return to a boil. Repeat the cycle 3 times, they float and they are cooked. The texture is more like a boiled won ton, without the soup. 
    Pull out with a sieve and serve with a sauce (I like gyoza sauce) my Taiwanese friends don't like any vinegar/acid (lime juice etc...) in the sauce. 
    I think most North Americans prefer the crispy fried taste of gyoza, but the boiled dumplings are a nice side dish and add some variety. 
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
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