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Red Beans and Rice

OptiontraderOptiontrader Posts: 173
edited October 2012 in EggHead Forum
My recent visit to New Orleans has me craving Red Beans and Rice.  I've made it before, but nothing that rivals authentic NOLA cuisine.  Does anyone have a "to die for" Red Beans and Rice Recipe?  Also, has anyone tried to make it in the BGE?
Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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Comments

  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,122
    edited October 2012
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    That's a good recipe. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • WhalerWhaler Posts: 102
    Add 1 lb Ham and 1 lb Tasso and make a really good recipe.
    Pensacola,FL
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    Whaler said:
    Add 1 lb Ham and 1 lb Tasso and make a really good recipe.
    +1 on that.  Also consider andouille and creole pickled pork as options.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 7,861
    edited October 2012
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    Here is a variation.  Chef J Folse always has great cajun recipes:

    http://www.wafb.com/Global/story.asp?S=470806
    Man, I just ate at R'evolution (his new restaurant) a couple weeks ago.  It was INCREDIBLE.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Here is a variation.  Chef J Folse always has great cajun recipes:

    http://www.wafb.com/Global/story.asp?S=470806
    Man, I just ate at R'evolution (his new restaurant) a couple weeks ago.  It was INCREDIBLE.
    +1 It was incredible.
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,951
    edited October 2012
    Seems Chef Folse uses canned beans.

    I've always used dry Camelia brand red beans because I was told my many that it is what every self respecting Cajun uses.

    Also, tasso and andouille sausage are great.  I have to drive 35 miles (one way) to Houston's only Cajun grocery to buy tasso.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    Don't knock Blue Runner canned beans - they're out-of-this-world good.   No one has a better canned red bean.  I've tried to cook dried beans and duplicate them, but never have been able to.  I'm sure, given time, I could, but they're a great addition for red beans dishes, and yeah, it's easy. 

    http://www.bluerunnerfoods.com/red-beans-and-rice.html

    John Folse literally wrote the encyclopedia on Cajun and Creole cuisine - an 850 page monster.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Encyclopedia-Cajun-Creole-Cuisine/dp/0970445717/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350055816&sr=8-1&keywords=john+folse

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,951
    edited October 2012
    Don't knock Blue Runner canned beans - they're out-of-this-world good.   No one has a better canned red bean.  I've tried to cook dried beans and duplicate them, but never have been able to.  I'm sure, given time, I could, but they're a great addition for red beans dishes, and yeah, it's easy. 


    OK, mon ami.  I will give them a try if I can find them.  I don't recall seeing that brand in the store, though.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • Don't knock Blue Runner canned beans - they're out-of-this-world good.   No one has a better canned red bean.  I've tried to cook dried beans and duplicate them, but never have been able to.  I'm sure, given time, I could, but they're a great addition for red beans dishes, and yeah, it's easy. 

    http://www.bluerunnerfoods.com/red-beans-and-rice.html

    John Folse literally wrote the encyclopedia on Cajun and Creole cuisine - an 850 page monster.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Encyclopedia-Cajun-Creole-Cuisine/dp/0970445717/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350055816&sr=8-1&keywords=john+folse

    I've never seen Blue Runner Beans in my area.  Are they good enough to order on line?
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    I think so.  You use these as a starter base for red beans and rice.  About a dollar a 16 oz can on Amazon.  http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Runner-Cream-Style-16-Ounce/dp/B00473JOLM/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • I don't tend to like canned things either, but I'm not opposed to trying these.  Are they just beans, or are they already cooked down and seasoned?
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    They're seasoned and prepared.    I'd say half the red beans you get at greasy spoons around town use these Blue Runners and add ham, sausage, etc.  You can buy it in gallon cans at most groceries - that's how popular it is.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Going to try my hand at making beans this weekend, but I'll have to check out these Blue Runners. 
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    edited October 2012
    I'd be surprised if you couldn't find them in a Whole Foods or some gourmet shopping market.

    The Blue Runner Chef is Frank Brigtsen and he owns and is the chef of one of the best restaurants in town - Brigtsens

    http://www.nomenu.com/reviews/Brigtsens.html

    http://www.bluerunnerfoods.com/our-creole-kitchen.html
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • I will look.  BTW, which is more traditional, pickled pork or ham/ham hocks?
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    That cajun pickled pork is actually cured - not vinegar pickled.  It's basically tasso without the spice.  I don't know what's more traditional - it's like gumbo - you put in whatever you have available. 

    I usually see diced ham and small pieces of sausage in the red beans, and they serve with sausage - frequently sliced down the middle and pan fried, or pork chop - breaded or just pan fried.  Lately I've been going to a place that uses a blackened chicken breast as the meat side.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • I'd be surprised if you couldn't find them in a Whole Foods or some gourmet shopping market.

    The Blue Runner Chef is Frank Brigtsen and he owns and is the chef of one of the best restaurants in town - Brigtsens

    http://www.nomenu.com/reviews/Brigtsens.html

    http://www.bluerunnerfoods.com/our-creole-kitchen.html
    Actually, I got interested and searched on the web.  Turns out, a local chain called Fiesta caters to various ethnic groups and started carrying a lot of N.O. type goods after the influx of folks after Katrina.  I had to go out, so I swung by Fiesta.  Sure enough, there was a place for Blue Runner red beans, but the space was empty.  I think the Cajuns snarf it up as soon as they stock them.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

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  • GaryLangeGaryLange Posts: 279
    I had this at one of my Boat Rally's made by a woman from the South and I couldn't get enough of it. It was awesome good.

    Red Beans and Rice

    1/2 cup celery finely chopped
    1/4 cup onion finely chopped
    2 16oz can kidney beans (drained)
    1 pound package Hillshire Smoked farms cajun smoked sausage cut in cubes
    3 cans beef broth
    1/4 cup water
    1 teaspoon garlic salt
    1 teaspoon garlic powder
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper
    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1 1/2 cup minute rice

    Boil celery and onions until tender. Stir in beans, sausage, broth, water, and seasonings. (you may want to sample and add more seasonings to your liking). Bring to a boil and stir in rice. Cook on low heat until rice is done.


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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    In general (although there are no hard fast rules on this), the red beans are made on the "wet" side, the cut up ham and sausage are seasoning for it.  This is ladled into a wide low-lipped bowl or deep plate almost like a thick soup.  A big scoop of white rice is plopped right in the middle or side of the dish.  It's ready to go at this point, but most everyone will add a protein, which gets dropped in the beans away from the rice.  Sometimes it'll come on a plate on the side if it's a big pork chop. 

    Frequently you'll get toasted/buttered bread on the side.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Now I'm really getting hungry.
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    My modus operandi when I'm cooking is to, once I figure out what I have and what I wanna make, is to look up a bunch of recipes, read them, then take the parts/ingredients I like, and the methods that make a difference (like roasting the spices/infusing oil in Indian) and then making up my own recipe with the ingredients I like, in the ratios I feel taste good.

    For creole cooking, it's pretty easy.  You start just about everything with creole mirepoix (celery, onion and bell pepper).  If it's roux based, you make or buy roux and throw the mirepoix in it. For red beans, that's the main seasoning.  Add beans, pork (sausage, tasso, andoille, whatever tastes good) and give it your own signature with whatever you feel will be good with it.  Look at other recipes to get ideas.  Keep it fresh, home cooked and you get a staple Monday New Orleans comfort food. 

    Sometimes I create a disaster, sometimes I make something absolutely delicious.  But you learn something every time.  Most important thing I've learned is it's impossible to remove salt.  So I try to adjust that at the end.


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,818
    My modus operandi when I'm cooking is to, once I figure out what I have and what I wanna make, is to look up a bunch of recipes, read them, then take the parts/ingredients I like, and the methods that make a difference (like roasting the spices/infusing oil in Indian) and then making up my own recipe with the ingredients I like, in the ratios I feel taste good.


    Dude, that is exactly how I have always done it. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,320
    When you get as old as me the disasters are less frequent. SOHK :D

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    My modus operandi when I'm cooking is to, once I figure out what I have and what I wanna make, is to look up a bunch of recipes, read them, then take the parts/ingredients I like, and the methods that make a difference (like roasting the spices/infusing oil in Indian) and then making up my own recipe with the ingredients I like, in the ratios I feel taste good.


    Dude, that is exactly how I have always done it. 
    It's the difference between being a chef and a cook, is one way to look at it.  It's funny, because SWMBO likes to follow recipes to the T.  If she's missing an ingredient, she'll tear the pantry apart trying to find it.  I'm way more laissez faire about it substitutions. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,197
    When you get as old as me the disasters are less frequent. SOHK :D
    I'm still creating the occasional disaster.  With high risk comes high reward.  Or abject failure.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,818
    When the wife lady cooks (almost never) and the recipe calls for a teaspoon of something, she gets the measuring spoons out and fills the teaspoon and then levels it off with a butter knife. I just dump whatever it is until I feel good about it. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,320
    Do you do a lot of Indian? I'm pretty good at that

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

    ·
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