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chefs knife

jjmillsjjmills Posts: 74
edited September 2012 in EggHead Forum
Looking to get a new chefs knife.  considering a Shun.  Anyone with any advice or recommendations please let me know. 

Thanks

Judd
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Comments

  • http://home.woot.com/#ref=tech.woot.com/sidebar/site@2.9-home/photo

    This is a great deal.  Today only.  I have one of these and it's top notch.  


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • Crap. It sold out.  I saw it when the sale started at midnight.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • Shun is a decent knife. If you want the best order directly from Japan. I have a number of custom knifes I ordered from this site. Fast delivery. Love them. http://japanesechefsknife.com/products.html
  • BadongBadong Posts: 125
    I've been really happy with my santoku from this company.  Planning to order these soon.  As you can see the reviews are pretty stellar.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000CF99O/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
  • I was also looking at Henckels knives.  Any one with pros cons on these?
  • jjmills said:
    I was also looking at Henckels knives.  Any one with pros cons on these?
    I have a set of Henckels Professional S knives. I love them but I would not buy them again. I would never buy a set of knives no matter what kind they were. If I could turn back time, I would buy one knife (whatever kind I used the most) and get the most expensive one I could stand to buy. For the other knives needed from time to time, I would buy some Henckels or whatever.

    I have found that I really only use one knife most of the time. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • That is my plan.  My wife and I where planning on dropping some $$ on a really nice set of knifes, but decided to but the nicest large chefs knife we can find and sprinkle in other not quite as expensive knives to complete our set.
  • Hillbilly-HightechHillbilly-Hightech Posts: 966
    edited September 2012
    I would HIGHLY recommend doing what my GF & I did, which was to go around to several different places & actually "try" (look, feel, touch, handle) as many different knives as you can.  We went to Crate & Barrel, Williams & Sonoma, Sur La Table, some other places - as many places as you can go in order to try as many different kinds as you can.  

    We tried Henckels, Victorinox, Shun, Wusthof, Michelle Bras, etc.  And we tried as many different models from as many different manufacturers as we could.  I think it was at a Williams Sonoma where we actually were there for a knife demo, and actually got to cut things like carrots using the knives.  

    After spending a few weekends doing this, we decided on the Shun Ken Onion.  I liked the "heft" of it, as well as the way the handle felt in my hand.  It felt more ergonomic & natural to me (as compared to say, the Shun Classic or Fuji).  

    Knives are very personal, and in my opinion, should "fit" the person using them.  To me, it's no different than buying a car or a gun - you need to "test drive" them first b4 you buy (or at least you SHOULD).  For instance, when I was looking for a home defense handgun, I had folks offering opinions ranging from every brand to every caliber:  "oh, you gotta get a Glock" or "Get a 1911", "Get a .40", "Get a .44", "Get a .357".  

    Well, I found a shop w/ a range which also rented out guns, so I rented like 8-9 different brands, models, and calibers.  I had one friend raving about the Glock, but when I tried it, it felt "cheap" to me, and didn't "fit" my hand.  The Springfield Armory XD, on the other hand, felt like it was made for me. And I settled on the 9mm caliber, because the .40 was a bit much for my GF, and I wanted something either one of us was comfortable using.  After all, if I'm not around & she's in a position where she needs, but if she's afraid to use it, it's just a paper weight. 

    Anyway, w/out going off topic TOO much, my point is that we can all tell you what WE think is the best, for instance, I could say the Shun Ken Onion - but then you might try it & think it sucks or it doesn't feel "good" in your hands.  

    Quality-wise, you can't go wrong w/ any of the brands I listed, and any listed by the other folks above me - now it's just finding the right model which feels natural in your hand.

    HTH,
    HH
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • chrisnjennchrisnjenn Posts: 534
    edited September 2012
    The nicest isn't a mass produced knife if you are truly looking for the best.  Plus buying a knife set isn't the way to do it.  Usually sets are the cheapos knifes of a manufacturer and loaded with knifes you never use. 

    Buy the best essential knifes like a chefs, paring, petty, maybe (debatable-I use mine a lot) a bread knife (this is where the mass produced Shun knife shines-Shun makes a great bread knife--the rest are just OK), and a nice pair of shears.  That is what most professionals or serious cooks have in their collection for the most part (give or take a little).

    German used to be the best a long time ago and live off their name.  No more.  Japanese steel and craftmanship are the best.
  • Global Chef's knife Kyocera santuko
  • jjmills said:
    I was also looking at Henckels knives.  Any one with pros cons on these?
    They are Great Knifes I have more than a few! Also look at Wustoff. Both are german, Stainless holds an edge longer than plain steel but plain steel (Chicago Cutlery) are easier to sharpen. Get the biggest chef knife you are comfortable with 10 inch or 12 inch. Best decision is how the knife fits in your hand and how you hold it. I do not like some of the newer knifes like calphlon because if you look at the heal of the knife (the thick part before the handle) the sharp edge goes all the way back. I have cut myself a few times with these. Most are the Japanese style knifes. the best knife is the one you always grab. If you want good but cheap. Look at some of th e mundial (sp) from a restaurant supply store.
    Dave (
  • Cons COST ! But find and buy on sale at Macys etc. 
  • Do what Hillbilly says.  Knifes are very personal.  What I may love may not work for you.  Once you find the brand/type/lenght/weight you like then shop around for the best price.  You would be surprised at the price range on a good knife.  
    I have a Global that I found at Bed Bath and Beyond that was 50% off (display) and with the 20% coupon I purchased a $200 knife for 80+tax.  
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • LitLit Posts: 2,230
    I would check this knife out. Many people on the forum own one and they are great. I have an expensive Shun chef the Bob Kramer edition and I would trade the Kramer for the Tojiro. I am not sure what you mean when you say will to spend money but I also have the Takeda 240mm Gyuto (chef knife) and its amazing. Do you know how to sharpen your own knife? http://www.chefknivestogo.com/toitkshwa21.html

    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/tagyas24.html

  • Lit said:
    I would check this knife out. Many people on the forum own one and they are great. I have an expensive Shun chef the Bob Kramer edition and I would trade the Kramer for the Tojiro. I am not sure what you mean when you say will to spend money but I also have the Takeda 240mm Gyuto (chef knife) and its amazing. Do you know how to sharpen your own knife? http://www.chefknivestogo.com/toitkshwa21.html http://www.chefknivestogo.com/tagyas24.html
    That is a good site for top quality knifes also.  I heard the Takeda is nice.  I have a custom made Damascus Gyuto (chef) knife with stag handle made my Master Saji.  Will last for generations.  Love it.
  • I have my eye on this one the 210mm Glestain Gyuto narrow blade 
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • I have my eye on this one the 210mm Glestain Gyuto narrow blade 
    Lawd hep me! Thanks for making my list a little longer. That there is classy. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,615
    edited September 2012
    Lit said:
    I would check this knife out. Many people on the forum own one and they are great. http://www.chefknivestogo.com/toitkshwa21.html
    Love this knife.  Lit turned me on to it a while back.  Just bought the "petty" today for the small jobs.

    Tojiro ITK Shirogami Wa-Gyuto 210mm


    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • Lit said:
    I would check this knife out. Many people on the forum own one and they are great. http://www.chefknivestogo.com/toitkshwa21.html
    Love this knife.  Lit turned me on to it a while back.  Just bought the "petty" today for the small jobs.

    Tojiro ITK Shirogami Wa-Gyuto 210mm


    that is number one on my list. Gary has a few and recommends them highly. Me wantey
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • Very interesting thread about certain things.
  • TonyATonyA Posts: 478
    We own a bunch of shun knives. I like their different knives quite a bit but they are expensive. They do take an edge well (I do my own sharpening). There was another guy on here frustrated with his Henkels and looking at Shun. I suggested he get his set sharpened. At the end of the day, despite liking some features, they are stilljust knives. I've never been anywhere and said I really need my shun here. if a cheap knife feels good in your hand and you know how to keep it sharp... Rock on. If you need something cool ... Shun can bring it, but hold as many as you can first.
  • MikeGMikeG Posts: 174

    I've been bitten by the kitchen knife bug and cycling through a fair number of them to learn the ropes.

    One I've been particularly impressed with for the $$ is here: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/riar24gy.html

    The AEB-L steel really does hold an edge very well.  The handle scales are tight to the metal and create a comfortable grip.

    These are a no-frills knife but the quality is there.    My Henckle Twin knives have been permenantly retired - steel is softer than I like using these days.

     

  • I've been drooling this whole thread.  My Chicago Cutlery set doesn't hold a candle to these.  Yet another thing to wish for.

    [-O< =P~

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • Can't believe there isn't one knife pr0n pic in this entire thread...


    Ever break in a baseball glove?

    Knives are the same experience...  They fit your hand and only your hand in a very specific way.  


    Some of my favourites are from a local asian market - very inexpensive but very "breakinable."  Like the mitt I use when playing catch - I wouldn't trade some of them for any expensive pretty knife.  Check out your local market, if you have one, and pick a few up for mere pennies...
    Large BGE -- Greensboro!


  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,009
    Hi, jjmills,

    As you have already seen, knife choice is a big topic.

    Here's what little I know about the brands you mentioned. The Shun's are good, but cost a little more than comparable Japanese knives. They do have a free sharpening service, which really helps.

    I had a friend who had some J.A. Henckel's Twin knives. They were pretty good, and he was able to get them at a discount price. They had a tendency to get micro chips. He was very good with DMT diamond plate sharpeners, and was able to restore them easily.

    As you can see, its not a matter of just buying a good knife, but also a matter of keeping it sharp. At the least, you will want to have a good honing steel, and access to a professional sharpener. It appears to me that most people who buy good knives also learn to sharpen them, as dull knives become intolerable.

    Here are a bunch of considerations.

    What knives have you used? Do you use a rocking motion for cutting, or a push/pull method? If rocking, go for a German style. The blades have a deeper curved belly, designed with a rocking motion in mind. Otherwise, the flatter Japanese knives are for you. I used a couple of Sabatiers for 30 years, and found the Japanese profile much like the French.

    If you can, get your hands on the knives. Check the balance, length, and grip. Personally, I prefer a 240mm long Chef's knife, and 100 mm for a parer. I much prefer a chef's that balances when I pinch the blade where it meets the handle. I don't like using blades that are distinctly unbalanced. I'm up in the air about Western vs. Japanese handles. I'm very used to the Western style, and the only problem I have is that the downward hook at the butt of the handle can crowd my hand on some knives. I have one Japanese knife that has a "D" shaped handle,

    I do have a few knives that are carbon steel, or have carbon steel cores. Most of the knives I have are stainless or stain resistant. I grew up using stainless, and so tend to be sloppy about keeping the blades clean. I'm unhappy when I find that I've set a carbon blade aside without wiping it, and then find the edge corroded from fats or acids. Its not that big of a deal, but I'm happiest with the knives that are stain resistant. They are, as a whole, able to take the edge I want without much hazard of chipping.

    There are a whole bunch of fine points, like blade "stickiness" that I won't get into. There are many many web pages discussing them. But one big issue to touch on is how sharp can the blade be, and retain it for a reasonable time? Most Western style knives are designed to have a 20 - 24 degree bevel on both sides of the edge. They can be sharpened to a more acute angle, but the edge is likely to roll and/or dull way too quickly. For instance, I practiced sharpening on a knife I got for 20 cents at a second hand store. I took it down to 15 degrees on a side. It would easily slice paper. 4 cuts through a soft pork loin later, it was dull again. My trusty old Sabatier-Hoffritz can hold an 18 degree per side bevel for weeks. I've got a Hattori HD petty at 15 degrees, and other than a few minutes of touch up, its held the edge for over a year.

    I do have sharper knives, but I don't need to use them that often. Aside from being really scary sharp, most of what I cut doesn't need to be paper thin. I also have a couple of second hand Dexter boning knives. Perfectly fine for hacking away at carcasses, but they will eventually be sharpened away to nothing.

    Have fun on you knife hunt. Good ones are a pleasure to use, and will last decades. I bought pretty good 3 piece sets from Benchmade for my daughters when they married. I was pleased when my elder daughter said they had ruined her for standard knives. She mentioned that when she was making food with her sister-in-law she goofed, and called the SIL's knives , ahem, crap.
  • Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • +1 to anyone that says knives are personal. I want a quality knife that feels at home in my hand, allows me to produce good food in a timely manner.

    Personally I'm not interested in the eye candy of impressing my friends and neighbors with what I own (except for my xl egg of course, lol). They're going to rave about your food and not your knife.

    My Henckel has an annoying habit of wanting to lie blade side up on the cutting board and I have to be 100% cognizant that it has indeed layed on its side when I set it down. I've been trying various knives in my hand for awhile now and when I find the one that's at home in my hand, I'll search the net for price.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,009
    Check out the first image at this site, and tell me your not drooling:

    http://www.raderblade.com/
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