Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Need some "old school" tips for BBack Ribs

TakTak Posts: 105
edited September 2012 in EggHead Forum
Hi everyone...I did a cook this weekend of baby back ribs....they came out ok.....not real happy with them...one of the issues among many were the burnt end of the rack....I laid the ribs flat on the adj rack.....all of the ends seem to burn to the point I couldnt eat them....looking for some wisdom on how to cook the long rack without burning the ends....I know there is an old school trick out there that I can use....thanks!

Comments

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,439
    Were the ribs exposed to the glow of the burning lump? As opposed to being over something to shield them from direct exposure.

    Also, what was the dome temperature?

    It is possible to cook ribs that are exposed to the coals, but it requires a low temperature, and frequent turning and mopping.
  • TakTak Posts: 105
    The coals were not glowing...I used the stone that came with the adj rig....the dome temp was 350...was doing turbo ribs...guess I will have to cook at lower temp to lower the risk of the burn...
  • I dunno about "old school" but I do them indirect, dome temp ~275, use the plate setter, legs up, then put the cooking grid on top of that.  I either use a drip pan and/or aluminum foil covering the plate setter. 

    I put the ribs directly on the cooking grid (no rib rack or anything).  I prefer a "dry" rib (using dry rub) as opposed to a sauced one (I use sauce on the side, after the cook, not during).  I don't foil the ribs (don't do the 3-1-1 or any other of those methods) - just flop 'em down onto the cooking grid & leave 'em alone for at least 4-5 hrs.  Then will check on 'em to see if they pass the bend test. 

    Also, I prefer spare ribs (St. Louis) over baby back any day. 

    Finally, since I've never done "turbo" ribs, cannot comment on that method, but I do know the way I just described produces ribs that are "better than any we ate at the Reno Rib cookoff" (according to my GF). 

    In my opinion, ribs, and pulled pork are some of the easiest cooks on the Egg, cuz you just "sit it & forget it" for several beers... errrr, hours!!  ;)

    HTH,
    Rob
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 12,522
    Don't have the AR but I do ribs indirect at around 250-275 on the dome.  If there are any parts of the ribs that extend beyond the drip pan I will put some foil under the exposed pieces-seems to help quite a bit. FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood.
  • TakTak Posts: 105
    Thanks guys....I think I will start going with the drip pan...I was doing them indirect but no drip pan....also thanks for the advice about the aluminum foil 
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,439
    Tak said:
    The coals were not glowing...I used the stone that came with the adj rig....the dome temp was 350...was doing turbo ribs...guess I will have to cook at lower temp to lower the risk of the burn...
    So no portion of the ribs were exposed directly to the coals? Then the burning had to come when the meat dried out.

    I've only tried "turbo" a couple of times for butts and ribs. The meat in all cases spent some time in foil, braising in its own juices. Then the meat was un-foiled , so the surface would dry off a bit, but not burn.

    Also, I do expect exposed bone ends to blacken and char a bit. By the end of the cook, they should be quite dry, and roasted thru and thru.
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,567
    I know that there are two stones you can get with the AR....do you have the round one or the oval one? I think the oval one is for ribs, I could be wrong.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 9,276
    I think the problem is that the ribs where hanging over the stone.  I've had the same issue occur when I made lots of ribs.  When you have a stone or plate setter in place, all the heat is directed around the stone in what I call the "jet stream".  I try to keep food of the jet stream.  One simple old school method is to cut the slabs in half to make sure they are not hanging over. If you are out of room, then use a big drip pan (or two)  or foil to try to block the direct heat.  

    I usually do 3 slabs on my my large, and I cut them in half and use a rib rack and they are safely in the "shadow of the stone"*

    *Stike- RIP. 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • Instead of the plate setter I use four fire bricks over a spider with the drip pan on the bricks.  Much more stable heat.


    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • I dunno about "old school" but I do them indirect, dome temp ~275, use the plate setter, legs up, then put the cooking grid on top of that.  I either use a drip pan and/or aluminum foil covering the plate setter. 

    I put the ribs directly on the cooking grid (no rib rack or anything).  I prefer a "dry" rib (using dry rub) as opposed to a sauced one (I use sauce on the side, after the cook, not during).  I don't foil the ribs (don't do the 3-1-1 or any other of those methods) - just flop 'em down onto the cooking grid & leave 'em alone for at least 4-5 hrs.  Then will check on 'em to see if they pass the bend test. 

    Also, I prefer spare ribs (St. Louis) over baby back any day. 

    Finally, since I've never done "turbo" ribs, cannot comment on that method, but I do know the way I just described produces ribs that are "better than any we ate at the Reno Rib cookoff" (according to my GF). 

    In my opinion, ribs, and pulled pork are some of the easiest cooks on the Egg, cuz you just "sit it & forget it" for several beers... errrr, hours!!  ;)

    HTH,
    Rob
    +1, except I've never had the pleasure of meeting his GF so not sure if she in fact like his ribs better than the ribs in Reno.... 
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
  • I'm doing my first ribs today, and taking Hillbilly's advice.  Not opening the Egg for 5 hours...using applewood to smoke, and have water/Pinot Gris in the drip-pan.  Can't wait to see how it turns out!

    BB


  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 8,007
    I'm doing my first ribs today, and taking Hillbilly's advice.  Not opening the Egg for 5 hours...using applewood to smoke, and have water/Pinot Gris in the drip-pan.  Can't wait to see how it turns out!

    BB


    Good idea, except save the wine for the cook, just water in the pan. If you feel something must be there use apple juice, but water is just fine. 
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    I've been doing four full racks, in a rib rack, over the plate setter legs up with a drip pan that barely fits into the setter. Like Hillbilly except for my use of a rack. Never had a problem with the ends burning.

    I've been using Dr. BBQs recipe for several years before I got the Egg in June of this year and it works really great on the Egg as well. 275 degrees for 2 1/2 hours. You can do the tenderizing part with the ribs tightly wrapped in foil slathered in honey on the Egg, but I usually just do it in the oven tightly sealed in a roaster pan. They aren't getting any smoke during that phase anyway. Have always gotten rave reviews even from the most skeptical critics with this recipe.
    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • Smoke a fattie and forget it!

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.