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Newbie intro. with questions

BGEGPBGEGP Posts: 42
edited July 2012 in EggHead Forum
I would like to introduce myself.  I just purchased a large BGE and have only used it once.  I have always used a electric vertical smoker and decided I needed to try something different.  I'm having problems keeping my temp down around 200-220 degrees on my BGE. 
I know you veterans are probably tired of answering newbie questions, but if you could give me a link or something that shows step by step how to setup for a low and slow cook and not have the fire go out I would VERY MUCH APPRECIATE IT.

Thanks a lot


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3504 x 2336 - 4M

Comments

  • BYS1981BYS1981 Posts: 1,440
    Search granda grubs post, he has a good guide to temps, but let me tell you.. much easier to hold 250-260 vs 200-220. Especially without a temp controller.
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,127
    200 is sometimes hard to hold. Usually, you need to light less coals.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,653
    the egg wants to be 250 dome temps, easier to maintain and you wont notice much difference in most low and slow cooks, butt brisket ribs ...

    at 250 dome temp and an inderect setup like a plaresetter the temps at grill level are about 25 degrees lower
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,127
    I find that brisket, pork butt, ribs ect turn out better from a 300 dome temp. Any lower takes too long and dries it out. Also, a 300 dome temp is about 260 grid temp on my egg. If your dome reads 200 you are cooking somewhere around 180
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,612

    +1 with all the above about calibrating your dome thremo and running hotter. Key is to not grossly overshoot your target temp-if you leave the dome open to initially get a good fire going-set the lower vent and DMFT to about where you expect them to be when steady-state at the time you shut the dome. Then adjust as necessary-and don't sweat "dead-on" temps for the low&slow cooks. 270*F+/- 30* is close enough.  Just get the BGE stable (45- 60 mins) and then let it do the work.  You can spend the cook chasing temperature (remember the fire is responding to air flow changes so the feedback loop has quite a delay time).  Wait til the smoke smells good before starting the cook.

    Here's a great reference site- http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramic.htm Welcome and enjoy the journey.

    Louisville
  • yep, no real reason to try to maintain 200-220... I've come to the conclusion that if I let the Egg find it's own "sweet spot" at each of the main cooking temps (low, med, high), that it's MUCH easier to deal with, as opposed to "chasing" the EXACT temp up & down all day. 

    For EGG-sample, if a recipe calls for 350, and, for whatever reason, the Egg seems to want to "hover" at say, 360-370, then let it.  10-20 difference over the time of a cook isn't going to make that much difference (obviously I'm NOT saying that if a recipe calls for 350 that you let the Egg get to 700, let's be logical & have some common sense). 

    But for the "low & slows" - I've found that my Egg likes to maintain 260-270 a LOT better & easier than trying to keep it at 240-250.  In fact, when I did a pork shoulder this weekend, that baby (the Egg) sat there at 265 for 8+ hours, and I didn't have to fiddle w/ the vents ONE dang time!! 

    Now THAT'S AWESOME!!  :D
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,127

    yep, no real reason to try to maintain 200-220... I've come to the conclusion that if I let the Egg find it's own "sweet spot" at each of the main cooking temps (low, med, high), that it's MUCH easier to deal with, as opposed to "chasing" the EXACT temp up & down all day. 

    For EGG-sample, if a recipe calls for 350, and, for whatever reason, the Egg seems to want to "hover" at say, 360-370, then let it.  10-20 difference over the time of a cook isn't going to make that much difference (obviously I'm NOT saying that if a recipe calls for 350 that you let the Egg get to 700, let's be logical & have some common sense). 

    But for the "low & slows" - I've found that my Egg likes to maintain 260-270 a LOT better & easier than trying to keep it at 240-250.  In fact, when I did a pork shoulder this weekend, that baby (the Egg) sat there at 265 for 8+ hours, and I didn't have to fiddle w/ the vents ONE dang time!! 

    Now THAT'S AWESOME!!  :D

    Well said.

    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • NewvilleNewville Posts: 84
    Might get loseto 200 dome in the sun today in midwest? Where the food is - most important. An accurate temp often overlooked when using BGE dome dials. That said butt is very forgiving. Some really good advice from lousubcap, travisstrick and hiibilly. I'd listen to 'em ;)
  • I find that brisket, pork butt, ribs ect turn out better from a 300 dome temp. Any lower takes too long and dries it out. Also, a 300 dome temp is about 260 grid temp on my egg. If your dome reads 200 you are cooking somewhere around 180
    amen

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