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Salmon on the Egg?

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Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,353
    I like stuff that lasts.  The egg is of that stuff.  Friends don't buy friends particle board.  Cedar planks are consumables.  I'll buy some disposable crap at harbor freight now and then, but most of my tools and the esp the furniture I make will last long past my generation.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Dan4BBQDan4BBQ Posts: 271
    Hey Stike

    I agree---but it is an uphill battle

    Dan
  • LizzieSampsLizzieSamps Posts: 894
    I agree with both of you, there are 2 types of buyers, those that appreciate and can afford quality and those that don't In my area of the county, there are not many tile roofs, just not the style. Now down in Indy in the historical districts they have slate roofs that are georgeous, expensive to repair, but will last a long, long time. In the last 30 years, homes have went from custom built to new construction jammed in on less than 1/4 acre lots, huge population boom. I live in a 30+ yrs old area that were custom built, now they need some remodeing every so ofter, but I love the big lots, trees, and knowing my house was made by hand! I was not thinking anyone was razzin' n me! I did'nt mean to hijack this thread!!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,353
    I agree with both of you, there are 2 types of buyers, those that appreciate and can afford quality and those that don't In my area of the county, there are not many tile roofs, just not the style. Now down in Indy in the historical districts they have slate roofs that are georgeous, expensive to repair, but will last a long, long time. In the last 30 years, homes have went from custom built to new construction jammed in on less than 1/4 acre lots, huge population boom. I live in a 30+ yrs old area that were custom built, now they need some remodeing every so ofter, but I love the big lots, trees, and knowing my house was made by hand! I was not thinking anyone was razzin' n me! I did'nt mean to hijack this thread!!
    That's cool, just intentionally trying not to flame you knowing you're into real estate, but at the same time attribute some (probably imaginary idealistic) responsibility that I think Stike's local agents should, but don't have, in preserving some "old world" quality in his hood.

    I live in a neighborhood that was established in 1719, and is a historical district.  Makes renovation difficult, and everyone hates the HDLC (historic district landmark commission) that has to approve any building permits for historical accuracy, but I appreciate the spirit of the commission.  Where you don't have one, everyone polices themselves, and you get cheap 3-tab roofs.  Not as purdy.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Daveh1976Daveh1976 Posts: 62
    I agree with both of you, there are 2 types of buyers, those that appreciate and can afford quality and those that don't In my area of the county, there are not many tile roofs, just not the style. Now down in Indy in the historical districts they have slate roofs that are georgeous, expensive to repair, but will last a long, long time. In the last 30 years, homes have went from custom built to new construction jammed in on less than 1/4 acre lots, huge population boom. I live in a 30+ yrs old area that were custom built, now they need some remodeing every so ofter, but I love the big lots, trees, and knowing my house was made by hand! I was not thinking anyone was razzin' n me! I did'nt mean to hijack this thread!!
    I take it you're not a fan of all those CP Morgan sites.  I use to always kid that CP Morgan moto should have been "Building tomorrow's gheto today."
    ;)
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    spent a lot of time in Vermont. slate town, in fact. Our barn (200 years old and counting) had a sagging roof, needed the slate fixed.  roofer came and fixed the sag and reshingled much of it.  600 bucks.  a neighbor came and dropped down (as a welcome gift) a walkway about 75 feet long of 4 foot by 4 foot squares of slate. amazing slabs.  Slate is cheap up there, unless you have out of state license plates. :))

    in the long run, slate is a cheap (or 'cost effective') roof, but only if you plan on living in it a hundred years or so.  and buyers aren't willing to reimburse for the expense because few people understand that it is a performance value, not simply something that 'looks good'.

    i don't understand the dichotomy sometimes. think of the finest historic public building in your town. maybe a library or something similar.  if you had to build a NEW library tomorrow, people would want the cheapest solution.  But if you tried to tear it down the old one, built to last a hundred years or more, longer with maintenance, there'd be hell to pay. folks are far more inclined to preserve the stuff that OTHER people paid for, and appreciate it, but conversely will opt to go as cheap as possible when it's on their dime.  just human nature. 




    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,353
    Yeah, that's human nature.  Back when this neighborhood was first developed, the most viable roof materials were slate and terracotta.  Wood shingles and shakes were about as durable as a coat of whitewash with the humidity, sun, rain, wind and hurricanes.  Later on the asbestos tiles became popular.  The historic district has made a few compromises because the original roofs are so expensive to repair and replace - they allow 25-year or better "architectural slate" styled asphalt shingles.  They also allow cement fiber replacement of lap siding.  If any new structures are built in designated historic districts, they have to meet the same criteria as old building renovation, but just for the facades that can be seen by the public.  As a consequence, I've seen houses go up that'll never last as long as the originals, but then again you simply can't buy heart pine for framing anymore because old growth forests are for the most part long gone.  And if you want to tear down a historic building, you have to jump through a gauntlet of flaming hoops.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    i found some 1x10 cedar clapboards when i built a new porch to match the existing siding.  stuff was 22 feet long, had literally 300 growth rings across the ten inches (very tight).  stable, and not one know in the entire length.  felt like a criminal painting it.

    i had all mitered corners too.  good primer, good paint, and a little preventative sealing of the cut ends, and not one miter has so much as moved in a year.  remains to be seen... but it looks stable, and the paint wears like iron.

    now just need to tear off the old aluminum siding and have the existing claps scraped and painted.  spendy, but if you do it right, i should only need to maintain it.

    funny thing about vinyl siding.  'no maintenance!'.  now, people realize is can be chalky and deteriorate too.  so they now sell a product to preserve it and fix or prevent the chalking. you just brush it on the siding once every five years or so.

    hmmmmmm
    maintenance free, eh?

    poor dude was just asking about cedar salmon.  this thread wasn't merely hijacked (by yours truly), it was driven into a cliff. 

    apologies.



    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,353
    I was just thinking about the hijacking of flight salmon on the egg.  Whoops, sorry dude!

    That old cedar is used a lot for siding around here.  Cypress and redwood too. When I made my shop, I also made the barn doors and windows.  Primer on all 6 sides of every piece of exterior wood (used fir), then assembled and primed again, caulked, painted.  6 years later, looks like new.

    Heck, might as well go full on hijack since Stike already claimed culpability.  Here's my buddy in front of my shop (helping him put together a harbor freight trailer).


    image
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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