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Brisket fail

michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
edited June 2012 in EggHead Forum

Ok, I got a full packer last week, it was only select grade and I should have gone to sams club and got the choice, but I figured the market would have better. Got there and was pissed and didnt want to go to sms after so I just got it. Came home and read about how terrible select is and got more upset. Watched some videos and took advice of the bbqpitboys and trimmed ALL THE FAT off of it. Then trimmed and trimmed and trimmed and trimmed. When  I was done, my 12lb brisket was about 6lbs LMAO. I sure trimmed that thing! (Yes I know I f****d up) Anyways, I injected with beef broth, and rubbed with some jacks old south meat rub and put it in the fridge till the next morning. Put it on at 225 all day and pulled it at 190. I then took it DIRECTLY to the chopping block and attempted to slice it. I say attempted because this damn thing didnt slice like it does on bbq pitmasters lol. It basically shredded. It was overcooked and not as moist as I thought it would be. I knew this was going to happen once I combined the crappy quality meat with trimming all the fat and half the brisket off lol. I am actually discouraged and do not know if I want to try another one.

 

 



"Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

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Comments

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    most folks have trouble getting it to be tender.  yours was just TOO tender.  the way i look at it, you took a less than ideal chunk of meat, made it a little worse by aggressive trimming (bear with me, it's not all bad, this is the set-up), and you STILL came out great.

    trust me, most brisket-fail posts revolve around it being dry and like sawing a hunk of wood.

    just as with poulled pork, if you stop short of shredded/pulled pork, you can slice it.  you just went beyond that to pulled beef.

    i wish my failed brisket turned out as good as yours.

    the 'select' issue isn't critical.  you just went a little long for that particular chunk of brisket.  try the fork-twist method every now and then after you hit 180-185.  go by that.  temp is a guide, not a rule

    don't walk away from it, especially since you got closer than most of us do our first time
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,752
    About all I can offer is that any who have wrestled with a brisket have experienced the epic fail.  Time to get "back on the horse" and go again.  You obviously learned a few things along the way and that alone will translate to a better end result next time.  If you enjoy the challenge, brisket definitely presents that-but once you hit the brisket home-run (as elusive as it is) you will want to replicate that cook.  At least that's how I approach it.  And there are several great sites for acquiring knowledge-don't be discouraged and points for telling your story.
    Louisville
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    Thanks stike, when I cut into it and pressed down, juices flooded my plate, so I was hopeful.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293

    @lousubcap

     

    Thanks, I guess its back to the drawing board. Hey at least it wasnt THAT expensive of a lesson. Had I got choice or prime I would be readlly mad lol.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • @lousubcap

     

    Thanks, I guess its back to the drawing board. Hey at least it wasnt THAT expensive of a lesson. Had I got choice or prime I would be readlly mad lol.

    select is not horrible. Like I said in your other thread, I've done plenty of great select briskets. It's not my first choice but I buy them all the time when i don't want to drive somewhere else. You messed this one up before you ever put it on. Don't let the meat snobs get in your head. All these guys that say buy $8 per lb Wagyu brisket or you will ruin your cook are just trying to fill a page and sound important. I promise you, a good brisket cook will run circles around most if they use select and the newbie uses Wagyu. Just like a good golf pro could take a 1970's set of clubs and beat your ass if you had a $2000 set of Big Bertha's. 

    You trimmed it up WAY too much and that is where things went wrong. before you ever put it on the egg.

    Don't give up. Next time, follow the plan and don't sweat it if you only have a select brisket. Buy better if you can, but it's not the end of the world if you can't. It's all in how you cook it.



  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    Should I have not trimmed it at all?



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • Mighty_QuinnMighty_Quinn Posts: 1,878
    I'll trim them down to about 1/4" fat remaining.
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    Yea, see I trimmed to and into the meat, I also cut the point off and still have that in the fridge all torn up lol.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • RAWRIGHTRAWRIGHT Posts: 8
    Shred the brisket and put it in a pan with onions then melt swiss cheese on top and make a sammich.  Kind of like a brisket philly, we call them grilled brisket and cheese.
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293

    I thew the whole thing away in an angry rage 5 minutes after it came off the egg.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    why throw it out? you had juicy pulled beef.

    i would say if you are looking for 'perfect' you should not try starting with brisket.

    anyway, tried to say. you were just barely outside the bull's eye.  not even close to a fail.


    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,747
    edited June 2012
    As far as trimming, trim to a 1/4", and trim off that hard fat. It won't render.
    better luck on your next one, though honestly it didn't sound lime this one was that bad. The meat even if shredded can always be supplemented with sauce.
    You said you pulled it at 190, but did you test with a skewer or probe?
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • Yea, see I trimmed to and into the meat, I also cut the point off and still have that in the fridge all torn up lol.
    I told you not too! Just write this one off and let us know when you try again. 

  • Stike is right. Chop it up and sauce it. It will be the best sandwiches you have ever eaten

    Lot of ways to skin a cat brotha! I love chopped brisket sammies- might be my favorite BBQ out there



  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    I will make sure to keep that in mind for my next fail.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    i would suggest you also move past the 'fail' thing.

    a fail is curing a country ham, hanging it for a year, cooking it incorrectly, serving two slices of it, and putting it in your fridge where it still sits until you figure out what went right or wrong.  even then, i don't consider it a failure, because i learned from it.  learned too that i wasn't far off from what it should have been.  which is like your brisket.

    if you are expecting either perfection or failure, then you need to either find a different hobby, or learn to drink while you cook.  that way you will have fun while cooking no matter what happens, and you can blame failure on the alcohol, if need be.

    need to relax, man.  if anyone here actually thinks you failed, i'd love to hear their logic.  you're just letting yourself get wound up too tight about expecting perfection.

    as mad max (guru from the other forum) says, if they all turned out perfect, they'd be average
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    As far as trimming, trim to a 1/4", and trim off that hard fat. It won't render.
    better luck on your next one, though honestly it didn't sound lime this one was that bad. The meat even if shredded can always be supplemented with sauce.
    You said you pulled it at 190, but did you test with a skewer or probe?

    BBQ GURU digiq dx2 meat probe was in the whole time, and I confirmed with my thermapen in multiple places. The thin part was at 200 and the rest between 195-197



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    temp is a guide.  try the fork test.

    (and sorry for trying to help.
    hahaha)
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293

    @stike

    I see what you are saying. I wasnt expecting perfection, I went in knowing it was going to be a learning experience, but still hoped to surprise myself.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • EggucatedEggucated Posts: 212
    It's all good and I agree with Cen-Tex chopped Brisket sandwich is amazing!  As long as it's not shoe leather it can be salvaged in some way.  It's like riding a bike, you can't give up after the first wipe out.  Trust me, every cook is different and you'll get the hang of it, just be patient.
    Thanks, Mike "Live in such a way that if anyone should speak badly of you, no one will believe it."
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    Yes sir! I'm not giving up...I am very passionate about BBQ. Just typically everything I cook is good and this was humbling.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • i would suggest you also move past the 'fail' thing.

    a fail is curing a country ham, hanging it for a year, cooking it incorrectly, serving two slices of it, and putting it in your fridge where it still sits until you figure out what went right or wrong.  even then, i don't consider it a failure, because i learned from it.  learned too that i wasn't far off from what it should have been.  which is like your brisket.

    if you are expecting either perfection or failure, then you need to either find a different hobby, or learn to drink while you cook.  that way you will have fun while cooking no matter what happens, and you can blame failure on the alcohol, if need be.

    need to relax, man.  if anyone here actually thinks you failed, i'd love to hear their logic.  you're just letting yourself get wound up too tight about expecting perfection.

    as mad max (guru from the other forum) says, if they all turned out perfect, they'd be average
    amen

    I wrecked DOZENS of briskets before figuring it out.And wrecked one last weekend (but as stike said- I can clearly blame the alcohol on that one)

    Chillax. Brisket is by far the hardest thing to get consistantly right. I'm still not anywhere near 100% on brisket.

    It's like gold- Hit one good one and you keep coming back and playing like sh*t for 6 months getting all mad that aren't really a pro! But unlike golf, you can actually really get good at briskets if you keep at it :))



  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194

    From Stike:  "as mad max (guru from the other forum) says, if they all turned out perfect, they'd be average"

     

    Best quote i've seen in a long time.  Beauty.

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    I agree...great quote.



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,171
    A late contribution to this thread.

    I'm from northern Indiana, and BBQ brisket is still something of a rarity here. The first time I had brisket, I was working with a fellow from Kansas City. I had been struggling with ribs for some years, but offered him some. He like them, and asked if I did brisket. I think my reply was "What's that?"

    A few days later, he told me he had gone to the market, and there were no briskets. He was astonished, and contacted the butcher. He got one as a special order.

    I went to the apartment house where he lived. He had dug a trench pit, and had cooked the brisket in that. (I've cooked that way too, but just easy stuff like chicken.) It was great. It was astonishing.

    After I got the Egg, figured I'd do some brisket. Still haven't bettered that 1st one cooked in a hole in the ground.

    So here's the secret. There is an invisible axis running from Houston to KC. People living near there absorb special molecules, perhaps from Ogallala aquifer water. This gives them the ability to make great brisket, just by smell and touch. For everyone else, nothin' but practice.
  • michigan_jasonmichigan_jason Posts: 1,293
    Ha



    "Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage."

  • A late contribution to this thread.

    I'm from northern Indiana, and BBQ brisket is still something of a rarity here. The first time I had brisket, I was working with a fellow from Kansas City. I had been struggling with ribs for some years, but offered him some. He like them, and asked if I did brisket. I think my reply was "What's that?"

    A few days later, he told me he had gone to the market, and there were no briskets. He was astonished, and contacted the butcher. He got one as a special order.

    I went to the apartment house where he lived. He had dug a trench pit, and had cooked the brisket in that. (I've cooked that way too, but just easy stuff like chicken.) It was great. It was astonishing.

    After I got the Egg, figured I'd do some brisket. Still haven't bettered that 1st one cooked in a hole in the ground.

    So here's the secret. There is an invisible axis running from Houston to KC. People living near there absorb special molecules, perhaps from Ogallala aquifer water. This gives them the ability to make great brisket, just by smell and touch. For everyone else, nothin' but practice.
    And I've probably messed up $1000 worth before getting it right.  Most people would just move on, but not down here. If you can't do brisket, you are a Yankee :)



  • LBJ's brisket chef would dig a hole in the ground, light a fire and put the brisket on a tripod grate surrounded by old corrugated tin roof panels. People came from miles to eat it.

    It's all about experience. Don't give up.



  • I did my dirst brisket weekend before last. It was a 4.5 pound flat already trimmed. The eresults were less than stellar. Dry and tough. My wife's comment was it was "swallowable". My dogs loved it :(

    With encouragement from Cen Tex, I tried again last weekend, this time a 4 pounder flat, pre-trimmed. I decided to go real slow and low, started out at 200, bumped to 250 after 2 hours. Started testing @ 185 and pulled at 200. FTC for one hour. It came out good, my wife has just cleared me for more brisket cooks, and the dogs are pissed. I hade brisket tacos last night. Oh and it was a12 hour cook.

    Hang in there, it's totally worth the effort. I hope my next one turns out as good, but that's the challeng right?
    Simi Valley, California
  • I did my dirst brisket weekend before last. It was a 4.5 pound flat already trimmed. The eresults were less than stellar. Dry and tough. My wife's comment was it was "swallowable". My dogs loved it :(

    With encouragement from Cen Tex, I tried again last weekend, this time a 4 pounder flat, pre-trimmed. I decided to go real slow and low, started out at 200, bumped to 250 after 2 hours. Started testing @ 185 and pulled at 200. FTC for one hour. It came out good, my wife has just cleared me for more brisket cooks, and the dogs are @#!*% . I hade brisket tacos last night. Oh and it was a12 hour cook.

    Hang in there, it's totally worth the effort. I hope my next one turns out as good, but that's the challeng right?
    Stop buying trimmed. You cannot make a really good small flat that has been trimmed. Buy a whole flat with the fat cap on it and try that. it will be way better than swalloable (I died laughing when I read that and I've made a few that weren't so kudos to you).

    You can trim the fat down to 1/4-1/8" but it has to have the cap. You can bang you head against the wall trying to get tender trimmed flats but you are wasting time and money.



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