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Smoke Rings

SmoothSmokeSmoothSmoke Posts: 141
edited June 2012 in EggHead Forum
I've seen lots of different bbq'd meats on several forums that are Q'd on ceramic cookers.  Why is it that most of the time the smoke ring on these cookers is somewhat tiny?  Just curious.  I'm not talking about smoke flavor, just the ring itself.  I've seen some fat smoke rings on these type of cookers but for the most part the rings are small. 

Comments

  • Scott805Scott805 Posts: 264
    I smoked a small brisket yesterday on my BGE for about six hours.  I was pretty impressed with the smoke ring (picture attached).  Not sure about the scientific process, but I am sure there are plenty of eggers here that will chime in.

    Large BGE, 2 Tier Adjustable Swing Rack System, three (3) bricks from Home Depot for raised direct, Blackstone 22" Griddle - Finally have a decent table!

    Dallas, TX

  • Sgt93Sgt93 Posts: 704
    I think most just use lump without adding soaked chips or chunks which would add to the smoke thus adding to the size of the ring.
    XL BGE - Small BGE - A bunch of Webers - A bunch of accessories - Ceramic Grill Works 2-Tier 
    Follow me on Twitter & Instagram: @SSgt93
  • SmoothSmokeSmoothSmoke Posts: 141
    Great looking brisket Scott805.  Very nice and dense ring you got there.

    Sgt93, that definitely makes sense. 

    Thanks!
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    soaking chips and chunks adds steam, not smoke, actually.

    usually a small or nonexistent smoke ring is from warm meat going on the cooker, something blocking the smoke (like heavy rub or mustard slather).  you can get a smoke ring from the nitrites in the charcoal itself, too.  don't really need extra (fresh) wood smoke
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • Sgt93Sgt93 Posts: 704
    Just like a steam at the gym works its way into your skin's pores, it also helps with smoke saturation into the meat. 
    XL BGE - Small BGE - A bunch of Webers - A bunch of accessories - Ceramic Grill Works 2-Tier 
    Follow me on Twitter & Instagram: @SSgt93
  • DuganboyDuganboy Posts: 1,118
    I smoked a small brisket yesterday on my BGE for about six hours.  I was pretty impressed with the smoke ring (picture attached).  Not sure about the scientific process, but I am sure there are plenty of eggers here that will chime in.
    What is in that glass Scott?
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    hmmm.  steam makes you sweat. water ain't getting in so much as coming out.  but that's not related to smoking meat.

    and meat doesn't have pores per se.

    there is some thought that a wetter environment allows the smoke to 'stick' more easily. but that's belied by the fact that you can certainly still have a smoke ring with or without a wet environment.

    if there's no smoke ring at all, it's almost always (on a BGE it seems) due to the fact that the meat has been out warming up on the counter. the smoke ring stops forming around 140 (surface temp of the meat)
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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