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Granite Egg table top question

BmeierBmeier Posts: 16
edited April 2012 in EGG Table Forum

I am building a table for my XL egg I will be getting soon and would like to make the top out of granite. In researching this I found a post here where someone had a granite top crack perhaps from the heat. Has anyone had a problem like this? I will also be using the egg in extreme winter temps here in Minnesota and was wondering if the temps would have an impact on the granite.

Any input is greatly appreciated! Also if you have any table tips or other advice I would appreciate it. I am planning on using the plans from naked whiz to start and go from there.

 

Thanks!

Bob

Comments

  • SandBillySandBilly Posts: 227
    edited April 2012
    I can't see heat from the egg causing any issues, the exterior just doesn't get that hot. I would think if it's a good piece of granite, you would be fine, in any weather condition.
  • It depends on how long you cook. Thermal insulators only slow conduction. Given enough time the external temperature will get awfully close to the internal temperature.

    I would strongly discourage you from having snow or ice on the stone table while baking pizzas. If you have extreme weather, keep the table clean while you cook. There is a big difference between the stone being in zero degree air and zero degree ice. It can handle the ice and the fire. Just don't do both at the same time.
    I finally took the plunge and bought my large Big Green Easter Egg from Roswell Hardware in Roswell, GA 03/31/2012
  • BmeierBmeier Posts: 16
    I will have a cover on it and it will not have any snow or ice when cooking in the winter time. I will want to do some low and slows for the holidays. Do you see this being a problem? 
  • SandBillySandBilly Posts: 227
    edited April 2012
    There is no way, it would have to go from sub zero to 900 degrees in a matter of minutes and I still doubt it would effect anything. Non issue, the egg will not produce that heat on the exterior, in that timeframe, if it did I would be worried about the egg cracking first.
  • There is no way, it would have to go from sub zero to 900 degrees in a matter of minutes and I still doubt it would effect anything. Non issue, the egg will not produce that heat on the exterior, in that timeframe, if it did I would be worried about the egg cracking first.
    Your first sentence describes what would have to happen for sub zero air to be a problem. Which, yes, is impossible. Air doesn't have the thermal inertia to pose a threat. I'm saying that your problem is if there was ice on the table. Then you could potentially have one piece of stone with sub zero ice, with it's high thermal inertia, on one end and then a hot grill about 24 inches away. That would be bad news. But, he know better than to do that. So, my work here is done.
    I finally took the plunge and bought my large Big Green Easter Egg from Roswell Hardware in Roswell, GA 03/31/2012
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    assuming there's a gap of half an inch or so, you aren't going to get a very efficient transfer of heat from the egg to the granite across the gap.

    if it were an issue, wood tops would be catching fire in greater numbers than granite tops are cracking.  and i can't remember of a case of either


    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • bigguy136bigguy136 Posts: 1,161
    assuming there's a gap of half an inch or so, you aren't going to get a very efficient transfer of heat from the egg to the granite across the gap.

    if it were an issue, wood tops would be catching fire in greater numbers than granite tops are cracking.  and i can't remember of a case of either


    +1
    +1
    +1

    Big Lake, Minnesota

    2X Large BGE, 1 Mini Max, Stokers, Adjustable Rig

  • BmeierBmeier Posts: 16

    Thanks for the great input1 I totaly agree about the wood table comparison. I have another question. Will the cut out that I get out of the section of granite be enough to place under the egg or should I use fire brick? Also do I need to get the feet for the egg as well? I want to make sure that I do this the right way!

    Thanks!

    Bob

  • I have mine sitting on granite and I'm still using the feet. I figure why not? It gives it slightly better airflow.

    The cutout should be plenty big.
  • BmeierBmeier Posts: 16
    Thanks again for all of the input ! Two more questions donfolks think that I should have the inside edge of the cutout smoothed and polished? In looking at designs on bge website for an xl table it shows the distance between the upper and lower shelf is 12.5 inches does this include the thickness ofnthe firebrick or in my case the section from the granite cutout?
  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 547
    I built my EGG cart with 2 granite wings.  Simple and very functional.  No heat problems and we live in N.C. so the winter issues are no problem here.  It gets parked in my garage.

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • BmeierBmeier Posts: 16
    Here is my granite counter top for my xl table waiting to be installed on my table next week. More pics to to follow.
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,882
    Here is my granite counter top for my xl table waiting to be installed on my table next week. More pics to to follow.
    That looks really nice and really expensive! 
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • BmeierBmeier Posts: 16
    found a great deal on craigslist!
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