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Prime Rib Quandary

thebtlsthebtls Posts: 2,300
edited April 2012 in EggHead Forum
It's hard to believe but this is the FIRST Prime Rib (Free Range from my buddy Mark at Missouri Legacy Beef) I have ever purchased. The price has always scared me off. This one was a deal I couldn't pass up. Aged 21 days...the question is, do I cut it into nice thick steaks or broil it as one big prime rib? Comments appreciated! It will be next weekends project for sure. Keep On Eggin'
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Comments

  • centex99centex99 Posts: 231
    oh that's a hard question... you could cut a few steaks off the ends and roast the rest!  Best of both worlds...
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  • That looks like a whole rib roll to me. Are the bones in? Cant tell from the pic.  

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  • EggbertsdadEggbertsdad Posts: 794
    If it is tapered a bit (I can't tell) I would cut a few steaks and leave myself a uniformed size roast. I like mine on the R/ MR side so I would cook it low on the BGE with a sear at the end. 
    Sarasota, FL via Boynton Beach, FL, via Sarasota, FL, via Charleston, SC, via The Outer Banks, via God's Country (East TN on Ft. Loudon Lake)
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  • GaryLangeGaryLange Posts: 238
    I would place the roast rib side down in a Stainless Roasting pan and coat the ends with butter. Do not salt the roast as it draws out the moisture. You can use other seasonings if you like. Have the temp at 450-500 and sear the roast for about 15 min. then lower to 325 and roast to an internal temp of about 110 to 115 as 120 internal is rare. Cover the roast with foil and towels. This will allow time for the juices to be pulled back into the meat and temp will rise to the 120 mark. When ready set the roast with the bones up and slice them off cleanly then slice the meat across the grain into whatever thickness you like. Go to http://whatscookingamerica.net/beef/classicPrimeRib.html and get the complete story. I did this and it was fantastic to say the least. I printed it out so I could keep it.
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    salt won';t dry out the beef.  simply not possible.  it will draw out some proteins along with the water though, and those brown up nicely.  gotta do it a while before you cook.  an hour or so, with the beef on the counter warming.  if you can wait two hours before putting it on, all the better
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Jameson19Jameson19 Posts: 72
    I have ruined a few pounds of this stuff to say the least. I have a lot of questions on prime rib. I've read that you should sear it in the 400-500 degree range for 15-20 minutes, then slow cook around 300 until internal temp comes up to the desired point. Does it matter if you sear it in the beginning versus the end? Has anyone ever just tossed it in the egg at 350, 400, 450, (or whatever temp) unitl the internal temp reaches what's desired? Anyone have experience doing this with some pics? 
    Large BGE in Vegas
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    sear beginning, sear at the end, no sear...
    all is good.

    a 500 degree high heat roast is a manner of searing that some have mistaken for meaning that th roast itself should go direct over the coals and be seared.  doesn't need it.  i find it burns the fat, and burnt fat isn't good. searing meat and searing fat are two different things, and most decent roasts have a nice fat cap.

    if you go high heat for the entire cook, 400 or so, you will have a small portion of desired 'done-ness' in the middle surrounded by gray meat.  if you go low, say 250, you will have much more of your desired level of done-ness, because the exterior isn't being blasted continuously with high heat.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Jameson19Jameson19 Posts: 72
    Thanks. Just after posting this I found the other thread below this on the main page. Gonna swith over there. 
    Large BGE in Vegas
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  • demodemo Posts: 145
    I did this one for Easter.  Indirect 350 degrees.  Internal temp. 125.  I coated it with Worchestershire sauce, Montreal Steak Seasoning and seasoned salt.  Was done in just under 2 hrs.  It was about 5.5 lbs.
    Easter.jpg 1.2M
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  • EggbertsdadEggbertsdad Posts: 794
    salt won';t dry out the beef.  simply not possible.  it will draw out some proteins along with the water though, and those brown up nicely.  gotta do it a while before you cook.  an hour or so, with the beef on the counter warming.  if you can wait two hours before putting it on, all the better
    Correct. The salt will draw out some moisture but that moisture dissolves some of the surface salt and goes back into the meat. It doesn't dry it out. 
    Sarasota, FL via Boynton Beach, FL, via Sarasota, FL, via Charleston, SC, via The Outer Banks, via God's Country (East TN on Ft. Loudon Lake)
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