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Brisket cook times

jerrypjerryp Posts: 226
edited March 2012 in EggHead Forum
Just wondering if anyone has found a specific, "X amount of hours per pound at Y temperature."(For Brisket)  I found a butt at 225 will need 2 1/2 hours per pound with a relatively small variable on my setup.  I would like to know this for planning dinner on a weeknight.  If you eat a few hours later on the weekend, you can always snack on a beer or two.  Thanks for the advice.

Comments

  • Waiting to hear as well! Last week did a 12 lb brisket 16hrs at about 225-240 throughout the cook! Seemed a bit fast to me.

    I have the Stoker now which came in this week! Doing a brisket late tonight.

    Looking forward to hearing some responses!
  • njlnjl Posts: 784
    I've done two flats recently, each a little over 5lbs, and each was on the egg about 6 hours.

    Neither came out as tender as I'd like until a few days of reheat in the oven for an hour at 350F (in the juices collected using a crutch when it hit the stall) as leftovers.
    First one was cooked to just under 196F.  Second was cooked to 207F.

    I think my wife's tired of "just ok" smoked brisket, so I'm done with this cut for a while now.
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,584
    12lb packer @300 dome is usually done at 8hrs for me. I use plan on 10 but 8 is usually the number. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,641
    I have not found the magical formula. I just cook to temp and give myself a few hours of wiggle room and hope it gets to temp fast enough. A few times I have had to result to the Texas Crutch to punch it home in time. Briskets are the hardest to cook IMO.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • I can help with Brisket if you like it TX style (dry rubbed, not sauced or mopped during the cook). After many years, I have it down and will gladly share.

  • Just wondering if anyone has found a specific, "X amount of hours per pound at Y temperature."(For Brisket)  I found a butt at 225 will need 2 1/2 hours per pound with a relatively small variable on my setup.  I would like to know this for planning dinner on a weeknight.  If you eat a few hours later on the weekend, you can always snack on a beer or two.  Thanks for the advice.
    Hey Jerry- Brisket, more than any other is "Done when it's done". Some take longer or shorter than others. Mine are about 1.5 hours per lb at 250 dome (which is much closer to 220 grill service temp). If you are at 225 dome temp, you are most likely cooking at 210 or less. Took me forever to figure that out!. won't hurt the meat, it just takes longer at those temps. If you use a digital temp gauge closer to the grate, you'll notice the big different between dome temp and cooking temp. Brisket and butts will hold for 4-5 hours in a cooler wrapped in foil and I highly recommend resting it that way for an hour anyway. Just plan on having it done early and letting it rest so nobody is waiting on the brisket. 

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    As I read the posts on here, everyone starts up differently.   Some load the plate setter quick, others wait.    Some lite in 2 places, get the fire hotter, then bring it back down - others bring it up slow.

    What I am trying to say - is coming up with a metric for hours x lbs ( that is a planning guideline only ) will depend on how you approach the heat and the loading.    After a couple of cooks, you will start to have a feel for given the way you start it off - what that means.    Best advice I would have is do things the same way each time - then the only variable is the composition of the piece of meat ( that will always vary ).   Over a few cooks, you will build a planning time metric that works for you.

    All of the different approaches that people use - are all valid.   For example there is not a right or wrong answer for when you put the plate setter in - the answer is - that you know what to expect and work along that plan.  Its kinda like the debate of Fat side up - or Fat side down.

    For me - a Butt is typically gonna range around 1.5 hours a pound, a brisket is gonna range closer to 2 hours per pound.   That said - I only cook briskets that are full packers - 12+ range. And that is based on the temps that I run and my startup process.   I tend to cook a butt a bit more agressive as it comes out of the plateau - I don't do that with a brisket.   Once again, personal cooking style.

    Cen-Tex hit the nail on the head.   Planning guidelines are just that - for planning.  It is done - when its done.

    One given is that each piece of meat is going to be a bit different.    If you find you need to speed things up - foil will do that.    If you finish early - hit the ice chest with it.   

    The BGE is the most predictable smoker I have been around - but there is still variability.   Not sure if this actually helps answer your question or not - but just my random thoughts.   Hope it contributes something.

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 226
    Just wondering if anyone has found a specific, "X amount of hours per pound at Y temperature."(For Brisket)  I found a butt at 225 will need 2 1/2 hours per pound with a relatively small variable on my setup.  I would like to know this for planning dinner on a weeknight.  If you eat a few hours later on the weekend, you can always snack on a beer or two.  Thanks for the advice.
    Hey Jerry- Brisket, more than any other is "Done when it's done". Some take longer or shorter than others. Mine are about 1.5 hours per lb at 250 dome (which is much closer to 220 grill service temp). If you are at 225 dome temp, you are most likely cooking at 210 or less. Took me forever to figure that out!. won't hurt the meat, it just takes longer at those temps. If you use a digital temp gauge closer to the grate, you'll notice the big different between dome temp and cooking temp. Brisket and butts will hold for 4-5 hours in a cooler wrapped in foil and I highly recommend resting it that way for an hour anyway. Just plan on having it done early and letting it rest so nobody is waiting on the brisket. 

    I shouldv'e started off by saying that I do use a digital temp controller and I place the alligator clip on the grate, so my dome temp is probably closer to the 250 mark you shoot for.  I've done quite a few briskets starting in my Weber kettle and graduating to the egg.  I don't do them as frequently because my wife and in-laws are much more partial to Eastern NC style BBQ.  I always use a brisket flat when I do cook them.  My first was a whole packer in my kettle.  That was a true excercise in patience.  Well, I'm rambling, so thanks for the advice and I look forward to trying it.
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    Over the past few years, we got more oriented towards BB's -- mainly cause I always struggled to cook halfway decent brisket on my old side box smoker.  At the end of the day - they just were not that good.

      After getting the egg, doing briskets on it - we are back to briskets as our favorites. Almost every other week for me now.  We freeze leftovers and use in all kinds of dishes - give alot away - eat what we can while its warm.

     

    Cookin in Texas

  • Just wondering if anyone has found a specific, "X amount of hours per pound at Y temperature."(For Brisket)  I found a butt at 225 will need 2 1/2 hours per pound with a relatively small variable on my setup.  I would like to know this for planning dinner on a weeknight.  If you eat a few hours later on the weekend, you can always snack on a beer or two.  Thanks for the advice.
    Hey Jerry- Brisket, more than any other is "Done when it's done". Some take longer or shorter than others. Mine are about 1.5 hours per lb at 250 dome (which is much closer to 220 grill service temp). If you are at 225 dome temp, you are most likely cooking at 210 or less. Took me forever to figure that out!. won't hurt the meat, it just takes longer at those temps. If you use a digital temp gauge closer to the grate, you'll notice the big different between dome temp and cooking temp. Brisket and butts will hold for 4-5 hours in a cooler wrapped in foil and I highly recommend resting it that way for an hour anyway. Just plan on having it done early and letting it rest so nobody is waiting on the brisket. 

    I shouldv'e started off by saying that I do use a digital temp controller and I place the alligator clip on the grate, so my dome temp is probably closer to the 250 mark you shoot for.  I've done quite a few briskets starting in my Weber kettle and graduating to the egg.  I don't do them as frequently because my wife and in-laws are much more partial to Eastern NC style BBQ.  I always use a brisket flat when I do cook them.  My first was a whole packer in my kettle.  That was a true excercise in patience.  Well, I'm rambling, so thanks for the advice and I look forward to trying it.
    I have better luck with whole packers over flats. All the moisture is in the point so when you remove that, you have to be perfect to get the flat to be super moist and melt in your mouth. It can be done, but I prefer the meat in the point over the flat anyway. Give a whole packer a rip next time and see if it does anything for you.They are harder to cut after but there are tons of good videos and advice out there. Once you do it a few times, it's easy. 

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