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My Recycled Table is now an Island!

tfoutchtfoutch Posts: 76
edited December 2011 in EGG Table Forum

I started with an old 2" tubular industrial table on big casters someone gave me years ago.  Made panels from some old doors from a remodel I did for my inlaws (House build in 1920's).  Poured concrete top.  Planed to make table for one egg, but decided to add for the second since table was so big.  This is my first attempt at pouring concrete, so a lot of extra work to make them look good. 

Ready for paint now.  Will post more pics as I progress.

By the way (weigh) - 560# concrete, table 150#, two large BGE and some doors and shelving - I'm thinking this thing will finish at around 1000 #. 

 See pics so far at the URL below

  photobucket.com/greeneggtable

 

TFOUTCH Algood, Tennessee

Comments

  • Table looks great! How hard was it to pour your own concrete?
  • Nice table, can't wait to see it finished...
  • My advice on concrete..."It's not hard if you know what you're doing".  I troweled too early and too often.  Messed up the finish relly bad.  Called for help.  We top-coated with a Portland cement mixture while it was still a little green.  I think it will turn out nice, but I have WAAAY more hours in labor than it should have taken.  This is my first slab EVER for anything bigger than a mailbox footing. 

    Try to form up a small box form and fill with concrete.  Play with finishing it before you decide.  If I had worked as many hours at my regular job as I have spent working on a few square feet of concrete - I could have ordered the top custom poured and shipped to TN from CA!  LOL

    TFOUTCH Algood, Tennessee
  • I am sure it will turn out great. I have found that several extra hours learning a new skill leaves me with a lot of pride in what I have made.
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,905
    edited December 2011
    One way to get away with not knowing anything about troweling is to do the concrete tops the way I did them.  I knew nothing about concrete or troweling before this project.  I build forms out of melamine board and then poured the concrete into the forms.  When set, you flip them over and the top is perfectly flat and smooth as a baby's behind!

    SEE LINK HERE:
    http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&Itemid=187&func=view&id=1120713&catid=1&limit=24&limitstart=0


    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • Considered that, but the size and weight of the top (14 40# bags of concrete mix) as well as the limits on exactly the holes had to be because of the existing framing on the table led me to pour in place.  I couldn't figure how to flip 500lbs of concrete. 

    A buddy of mine did his like you are suggesting and his turned out nice.

     

    TFOUTCH Algood, Tennessee
  • By the way Choke, what mix did you use for your tops?  What is that greenguard you used for you blank, styrofoam?

    TFOUTCH Algood, Tennessee
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,905
    edited December 2011

    Considered that, but the size and weight of the top (14 40# bags of concrete mix) as well as the limits on exactly the holes had to be because of the existing framing on the table led me to pour in place.  I couldn't figure how to flip 500lbs of concrete. 

    A buddy of mine did his like you are suggesting and his turned out nice.

     

    Yeah, weight was a big consideration for me as well.  I wanted to do one piece but ended up doing the top in two pieces.  I estimate the full square (right side) was approx. 300 lbs and the piece where the egg sits (left side) maybe 225 lbs.

    By the way Choke, what mix did you use for your tops?  What is that greenguard you used for you blank, styrofoam?

    I used "Quikrete countertop mix". I ended up using a total of (10) 80lb bags. Six bags for the two countertop pieces and four bags for the two "shelves".

    Yup, the green piece is that styrofoam panel (usually comes in 4' x 8' sheets and different thicknesses) you can get from your favorite hardware type store.  That stuff is a pain in the you know what to cut.  I ended up doing a rough cut with a box cutter and then sanded it to correct size/shape.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • Hey Choke, where is the photo of yours?  I want to copy.
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,905
    edited December 2011
    Glad you like it.  Holding up well so far and should handle the winter just fine :)
    If you need any details, let me know.  Follow link here:
    http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&Itemid=187&func=view&id=1120713&catid=1&limit=24&limitstart=0

    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • Eggs in the table.  Now time to paint!
    TFOUTCH Algood, Tennessee
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