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How do I...Cedar Planked Salmon

500500 Posts: 2,536
edited September 2011 in EggHead Forum
I just got some cedar planks off Woot, so it's cedar planked salmon time.  I've never planked salmon before.  I can't seem to find a definitive method on how to do them.  So I'm thinking after what I've read, I have a method.  Any advice is appreciated.  This is what I was thinking:

Buy fresh salmon filets from the display, not the prepackaged ones, skin off, and bloodline removed.
Soak planks for two hours in water.
Egg at 350 raised rig
DP Raging River, capers, lemon slices, fresh dill on filets 30 minutes before grilling.
Place planks on grill for 3 - 4 minutes to get them smoking.
Salmon on planks, do not flip,  grilled about 20 minutes or until 135 internal temp.
Serve on planks with steamed broccoli, cous cous, and Pinot Noir.

Does that sound right?

Large BGE; Midlothian, Virginia
I like Pig Butts and I can not lie.
"Barbecue is a journey, one meal at a time."

Comments

  • SpoonSpoon Posts: 328
    I have never worried about removing the skin, I just don't eat it.

    One of my favorite preparations for cedar planked salmon I got from Steve Raichlen BBQ USA a few years ago. Put the salmon on the soaked plank with some salt and pepper then slather it with a thick layer of good Dijon mustard and then put on a thick layer of brown sugar.
    "Pork so tender you can pull it with a spoon." ~Spoon
  • 500500 Posts: 2,536
    Thanks.  Saw that one on Food Network's site.  I'll try that one next.  What I'm more concerned about is temp., time, and technique.
    Large BGE; Midlothian, Virginia
    I like Pig Butts and I can not lie.
    "Barbecue is a journey, one meal at a time."
  • If you want the plank to smoke, then you don't need to soak it very long, if at all.  Also, if you want smoke from the plank, you will probably need a higher temp than 350 when using a raised gird.  You might get some ideas here: Cedar-Planked Shrimp on Alder Planks  You might try to find some alder planks in your future experiments.  I don't care for the cedar planks myself, and wouldn't try to get them smoking if I were using them to cook on.  Good luck!
    The Naked Whiz
  • 500500 Posts: 2,536
    If you want the plank to smoke, then you don't need to soak it very long, if at all.  Also, if you want smoke from the plank, you will probably need a higher temp than 350 when using a raised gird.  You might get some ideas here: Cedar-Planked Shrimp on Alder Planks  You might try to find some alder planks in your future experiments.  I don't care for the cedar planks myself, and wouldn't try to get them smoking if I were using them to cook on.  Good luck!
    So you feel smoking the plank will make it too strong, just cooking on it is strong enough; say if you were forced to grill on cedar planks?
    Large BGE; Midlothian, Virginia
    I like Pig Butts and I can not lie.
    "Barbecue is a journey, one meal at a time."
  • Well, I don't really want the taste of smoking cedar on my fish.  So I use alder planks for the most part.
    The Naked Whiz
  • BotchBotch Posts: 5,704
    I too prefer alder to cedar, however I go the opposite direction from Whiz regarding soaking; I soak them overnight, two hours they seem to catch fire way too easily.  Two caviats: I actually haven't made planked salmon on my Egg yet, I'm speaking of my gas grill experiences (and I know what's for supper tomorrow night now, thanks!).  Secondly, the wood you got off of Woot, is it 3/4" thick like you get at the lumberyard, or the thinner wood sold just for grilling?  The thinner wood probably needs less of a soak (hint: wood from the lumberyard is much cheaper, and because its thicker it can be used many more times before it has to be tossed).
     
    More importantly: lose the Pinot Noir and pick up a crisp Pinot Grigio, chilled, instead!    B-)
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • 500500 Posts: 2,536
    Thanks all.  I kind of am in with the cedar now, so I'll make the best of it.
    Large BGE; Midlothian, Virginia
    I like Pig Butts and I can not lie.
    "Barbecue is a journey, one meal at a time."
  • SqueezySqueezy Posts: 1,102

    I won't use cedar ... in my opinion, it has no place in cooking ... it stinks!

    Good for shingles and cedar chests ...

    Alder, maple or oak will yield much better results.

    Never eat anything passed through a window unless you're a seagull ... BGE Lg.
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