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Egg'd & sous-vide pork, attempt 2

gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,235
edited 9:06PM in EggHead Forum
Awhile back I posted about trying to blend sous-vide cooking chunks of pork shoulder, and then finishing them on the Egg. The results were not so good, because the 30 minutes on the Egg needed to brown up the pork wasn't enough time to render out fat.

So I reversed the process. I rubbed 4 thick country-rib pork shoulder pieces, and did them indirect, dome 250, with a great big chunk of peach wood. At about 45 minutes, they had reached an internal of 140.

I took them off, bagged them, and dropped them in the water bath at 140 for the next 72 hours.

After taking them out, I had maybe 1.5 C.s of porky liquid that I drained from the bags. Tho' it would have made a great sauce base, I decided to just mix it into massed 'taters. It worked well.

I blasted the pork pieces with my weed burner, and then shredded them. There was only a teaspoon of fat left in each. It made for good sandwiches. Not quite as good as from a freshly cooked whole butt, but still quite edible.

While I would recommend doing whole butts and picnics for a superior result, this works well when all you can get is smaller pieces. I'm glad to have worked this out, because the farmer I get organic pig from usually has butts and picnics processed into halves or thirds for a better price point.

Comments

  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,008
    Cool post.
    Had good results with searing first and then water bath with lean cuts such as top sirloin and flank steak. Was not as good with ribeye. I like the sear first as it shrinks and thickens the steak on the sear. Water bath first keeps the steaks thin. Texture has been very good with sous vide.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • Weekend WarriorWeekend Warrior Posts: 1,702
    Hey Glen, Darian. Have either one of you seen this machine? http://sousvidesystems.com/ I've been following your posts on sous vide for some time and have even gone waaaaay back and read some from Unconundrum. Trying to educate myself. I am tempted to jump on the sous vide bandwagon and since I'm electrically and mechanically challenged, I thought this was a good fit for me. Any thoughts?

    Thanks,

    Mark


    Edit: Even though the website lists a 6 mos. warranty for both parts and labor, it is actually a year for both. I confirmed this with the owners.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,235
    Although some of the smoke and rub flavor washed off in the rendered juices, I was pleased that much of the flavor soaked into the meat. The texture was not quite like with the water bath 1st. Not quite so succulent.

    I've got some 72 hr. short ribs in right now. Can't wait.
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,008
    I'm limited by size of food that will fit but I purchased this one.

    http://www.sousvidesupreme.com/product.aspx?productid=21&deptid=1&;

    I liked the all in one unit and the reviews were great.
    Very even heat and the temp is spot on.

    This is still very new to me and I'm still very low on the learning curve.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,008
    Did you sear or roast the short ribs at all first?
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • Weekend WarriorWeekend Warrior Posts: 1,702
    Yeah, I looked at that one too and one from PolyScience that's about a grand. The one I'm looking at is fairly new to the market, but I like the flexibility it offers both in the amount of food you can do and also it's portability/storage when finished. Wondering where I can hide another piece of cooking equipment from the wife. :laugh:
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,235
    No sear first. I've done them sear at the end, both times in a pan at the end. These will be finished on the Egg.

    They were the first sous-vide I tried, and the results were astonishing. All the beefy flavor, but soft as pillows, even with a sear.
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,008
    All very good points but I never hide things from my wife. :laugh:
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,235
    Uh oh, sounds like a problem. Maybe you can hide the sou-vide under the chamber vacuum sealer. ;)
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,008
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • Weekend WarriorWeekend Warrior Posts: 1,702
    Great idea! Not exactly under it, but inside it! If I pull the one side panel off, there's quite a bit of room on one side of the pump on the lower shelf. :woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:
    107-0747_IMG.jpg
    Thanks Glen, you're a genius! :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
  • WWSisWWSis Posts: 1,448
    Love the creativity, brother! ;) but I don't think there is any chance that will work... :woohoo:
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,235
    O.K. if you've got that, go for whatever SV you want. If I wasn't so intrigued by what that could do, I'd be... hmm, Blue with envy.
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 5,381
    That's one serious kick-ass equipment you got there Mark!
    Gary
    canuckland
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