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semi-OT: Good article on food safety temperatures

gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,460
edited 4:36PM in EggHead Forum
As the title says, there is a good article on food safety regulations concerning safe temperatures for cooking.

[url]http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=complex-origins-food-safety-rules

Notes that because of American love for beef, steak tartar is ruled O.K., but the chicken should be cooked till dry, not because that is what is safe, but because it is believed that is what people want.

I've gone thru this debate with my wife repeatedly, and she finally accepts pink pork. The article hints that we could probably have tenderloin tartar in all safety.
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Comments

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    I think most people's Food safety ideas have more to do with taste preferences and what mom did than with food safety. It's not a slam, but I do think people should be more willing to consider even just trying not overcooking so much food.

    Tenderloin tartare is maybe looked at sideways, but there's no reason to worry about it. Odds are actually in your favor that it is safe. Yet any risk is often perceived as unacceptable. That's not a good way ( well, not a logical way)to move through life.

    Odds are one in 5000 (it is estimated) that you'll die in a car accident today. That stops literally no one from driving. Yet the odds (I'm always dubious when 'they' pronounce odds) are around 1 in 3 million. Put more succinctly: you are more likely to die from appendicitis than salmonella.

    I know I know, "that's all googled!" "I still say well done is safer!"

    True
    Some are overly prudent, some are overly inquisitive, and some shrug

    And every single one of those types is thankful that's their type. No harm no foul
    But I am just thankful I tried the 60- day carpaccio. Hahahah
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,460
    Its a little hard to get over years of "worst case scenario" instructions. I had no idea that the regulations were based on the premise that the food was so infested to begin with as to be toxic, and needed to be cooked till there was no more than 1 bacterium left.

    Still, wash your hands often, and don't sneeze on dinner.
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,931
    you were probably more apt to die from overcooked foods 50 years ago than under cooked foods today just because the old school refused to toss it out :laugh:
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    it is also predicated on utter incompetence in the kitchen, too. :laugh:

    "if we say `140', and they have a broken thermometer, or don't stick it in all the way, they can still get sick. let's just say 180 to be safe"
    hahaha
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Good link...
    Thanks :)
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